From NKAA, Notable Kentucky African Americans Database (main entry)

St. Augustine Church (Louisville, KY)

The first African American Catholics were slaves who arrived in Kentucky with the settlers from Maryland in 1785. In 1869, Father John L. Spalding was appointed to organize African American Catholics in Louisville, KY. Worship was held in the burial crypt in the basement of the Cathedral of the Assumption. By 1870, Father Spalding had raised enough money for the building of a new church, St. Augustine, on Broadway between Fourteenth and Fifteenth Streets. St. Augustine is the oldest African American Catholic church in Louisville; when it opened in 1870, it was one of six in the United States. St. Augustine School opened in 1921; the name later changed to Catholic Colored High School and then changed again to Catholic High in the 1940s. The present St. Augustine Church, dedicated in 1912, is located at 1310 W. Broadway. For more see Centennial 1870-1970: St. Augustine Church, 1310 Broadway, Louisville; B. Pike, "Long-closed school not forgotten," The Courier-Journal, 02/28/99; and S. Edelen, "Looking Back; 135-year-old St. Augustine plans museum,"The Courier-Journal, 01/26/05.

References

Cited in this Entry

NKAA Source: Centennial 1870-1970: St. Augustine Church, 1310 Broadway, Louisville
NKAA Source: Courier-Journal [Louisville] (newspaper)

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Cite This NKAA Entry:

“St. Augustine Church (Louisville, KY),” Notable Kentucky African Americans Database, accessed August 20, 2019, https://nkaa.uky.edu/nkaa/items/show/1208.

Last modified: 2017-07-19 17:51:30