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Baker, Henry Edward
Birth Year : 1922
Death Year : 2014
Reverend Henry E. Baker was a civil rights activist, a pastor, and a city commissioner in Winchester, KY. A school was named in his honor, the Henry E. Baker Intermediate School, dedicated on August 3, 2014. For 38 years, he was pastor of the Broadway Baptist Church, 1955-1993. He was among those who helped integrate the Winchester schools in 1956. In 1977, he was elected the moderator of the Consolidated District Association of Kentucky Baptist. In 1978, he established a fund drive for Elizabeth Greene who was blinded on August 4, 1978, when an unknown person fired into her car and the bullet struck her in the head ["Fund drive," Kentucky New Era, 12/28/1978, p.29 - online]. He was chair of the Winchester Human Rights Commission. In 1979, he became the first African American to serve as a city commissioner in Winchester, and he also served as vice mayor from 1980-1984. In 2000, he was inducted into the Kentucky Human Rights Commission Civil Rights Hall of Fame. In 2006, the block in Winchester between Washington Street and Broadway, was renamed from Bell's Alley to Reverend Baker Way. Reverend Baker also received the Martin Luther King Jr. Award in 2007. Reverend Henry E. Baker was born in The Pocket in Wilmore, KY, he was the son of Mary E. Overstreet Baker (1894-1985) and Henry Baker (1890-1973) [source: Ms. Hallie Miller; Kentucky Birth Index; FindAGrave, Henry Baker; and 1930 and 1940 U.S. Federal Census]. Rev. Baker was the husband of Sarah F. Prentice Baker for 69 years. He was a WWII veteran; Rev. Baker enlisted in Cincinnati, OH, April 16, 1943 [source: U.S. WWII Army Enlistment Records]. He was the brother of Fred Baker. This entry was submitted by Ms. Hallie Miller.
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Military & Veterans, Politicians, Politics, Appointments & Elections, Ministers, Pastors, Preachers, Religion & Church Work, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: The Pocket in Wilmore, Jessamine County, Kentucky / Winchester, Clark County, Kentucky

Beauty Shops (Louisville, KY)
In 1968 the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights conducted a study on the nature and extent of Negro ownership of business in Louisville. The commission found that beauty shops were a leading business: Of the 490 Negro-owned businesses, 42.2% were beauty shops, 19.3% barber shops. Within Louisville as a whole, Negro-owned beauty shops were 42.74% of the total number of beauty shops in the city and 32.14% in the entire county. For more see Black Business in Louisville, by the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights. For earlier information on African American beauty shops and other occupations, see A study of business and employment among Negroes in Louisville, by Associates of Louisville Municipal College, University of Louisville, Louisville Urban League, and Central Colored High School (1944).
Subjects: Businesses, Cosmetologists, Beauty Shops, Hairdressers, Beauty Supplies, Urban Leagues, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Black Graduates of Kentucky (periodical)
Start Year : 1970
End Year : 1998
Beginning in 1970, the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights published the title Black Graduates of Kentucky. It was an annual publication that was very unusual because it was a government directory that attempted to list the African American college and university graduates in the entire state. Most other publications of this type were not produced by the state, but rather by higher education institutions in specific states, and the publications focused on the individual institution's graduates only. The Kentucky directory title changed in 1994 to African American Graduates of Kentucky Directory. The publication ceased in 1998.
Subjects: Resources Dedicated to Kentucky African Americans [Statewide], Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Kentucky

Blythe, Henry L.
Birth Year : 1942
In 2012, Henry L. Blythe received the Outstanding Citizen Award from the Mayfield Human Rights Commission. He had served as chair of the commission and was described as a tireless champion of civil rights in Mayfield, KY. His recognition included 23 years of service in the U.S. Air Force, where he received the Humanitarian Service Medal for his performance during the Iranian hostage rescue attempt. In 1984, after his retirement from the military, Henry L. Blythe was employed in the U.S. Postal Service. In 1991, he became the postmaster of Dexter, KY, and was one of the two African American postmasters in western Kentucky. He was also one of the 10 African American postmasters in the state of Kentucky. He was postmaster in Boaz, KY, when he retired from the U.S. Postal Service in 2007. Also in 2007, Governor Ernie Fletcher appointed him to a one year term to the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights. Three years later, Henry L. Blythe was nominated for the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame. Henry L. Blythe was born in Graves County, KY. For more see the press release "Governor Fletcher Appoints Members to the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights," 09/21/2007 at the Kentucky.gov website; and "Former Boaz Postmaster Named Outstanding Citizen," 02/27/2012, at West Kentucky Star.com.
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Military & Veterans, Postal Service, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Mayfield & Boaz, Graves County, Kentucky / Dexter, Calloway County, Kentucky /

Caulder, William Francis "Jelly"
Birth Year : 1915
Death Year : 2001
William F. Caulder was a farrier for more than 45 years. He was well respected for the work he did for some of the biggest names in the horse industry. He put shoes on horses at a number of local farms and at race tracks such as the Lexington Standardbred and Churchill Downs. Caulder was inducted into the International Horseshoers Association and in 1991 was honored by the Bluegrass Horseshoers Association. William F. Caulder was also active in the community, serving as chair of the Lexington-Fayette County Commission on Human Rights and working with the Robert H. Williams Cultural Center. He was a graduate of the old Dunbar High School and attended Clark College in Atlanta for one year. Caulder was a World War II veteran: he enlisted in Cincinnati, OH on August 22, 1942, according to his enlistment record. Caulder was born in Lexington, KY, the son of William and Julia Caulder, according to the 1930 U.S. Federal Census. For more information see J. Hewlett, "William F. 'Jelly' Caulder, 86 - Retired farrier to equine stars," Lexington Herald-Leader, 08/16/2011, p. B2.

 

Access Interview
Listen to the William F. Caulder oral history interview online, and read more about him at the University of Kentucky Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, item record in the SPOKE Database.
Subjects: Jockeys, Horsemen, Horse Breeders, Trainers, Betting, & The Derby, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky

Childress, William Hobbs, Jr.
Birth Year : 1911
Death Year : 1993
Born in Washington D.C., William H. Childress grew up in Nashville, TN. He was a 1934 graduate of Fisk University and came to Kentucky at the invitation of his cousin, Dr. Franklin Belver Beck, a dentist in Louisville. Childress remained in Louisville and in 1960 was elected Representative of the 42nd Legislative District, serving only one term. He is known for introducing House Bill no. 163, which created the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights. William H. Childress, Jr. was the son of Lillian Childress Hall and William H. Childress, Sr. He was the husband of Joanna Kimble Offutt Childress. For more see Childress touched many one man by Ann R. Taylor Robinson.

See photo image of William Hobbs Childress at Great Black Kentuckians, at the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights website.

Access Interview Read about the William H. Childress oral history interviews available at the University of Kentucky Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, item records in the SPOKE Database.
 
Subjects: Migration North, Politicians, Politics, Appointments & Elections, Migration South, Legislators, Kentucky, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Washington D. C. / Tennessee / Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

First Open Housing Ordinances in Kentucky
Start Year : 1966
Bardstown and Nelson County, KY, were first in the state to adopt the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights' model open housing ordinance, which prohibited racial discrimination in housing, effective July 28, 1966. Covington and Kenton County were next to pass the ordinance, followed by Lexington and Fayette County. Source: A Kentucky Civil Rights Timeline, by KET (Kentucky Educational Television); and Freedom on the Border, by C. Fosl and T. E. K'Meyer.
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Housing, Fair Housing, Open Housing, Housing Agencies, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky / Covington, Kenton County, Kentucky / Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky

Hammons, James W.
Birth Year : 1927
Death Year : 2006
Dr. James W. Hammons was the first African American physician to practice medicine at Central Baptist Hospital, in Lexington, KY, and he was the first African American member of the Kentucky Medical Association. There were many firsts in the medical field for Dr. Hammons. He was also a school teacher in Hopkinsville, KY. He was vice-president of the Lexington Committee on Open Housing and he was a member of the Human Rights Commission. His educational career included West Virginia State where he played football and was injured, forcing him to return to Louisville. Though he was born Kentucky, Hammons' mother had moved back to Tennessee when his father died around 1932. He returned to Louisville a little later to live with his uncle, Dr. John M. Hammons. After graduating from high school, he left Louisville to attend college. When James W. Hammons returned to Louisville after his football injury at West Virginia State, he next attended and graduated in 1950 from Kentucky State College [now Kentucky State University] where he was manager of the football team. He also attended the University of Kentucky where he earned his master's degree in 1954; Hammons was the first African American admitted to the medical department [public health bacteriology]. Hammons also graduated from the Chicago School of Osteopathy in 1959 [now the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine at Midwestern University]. He returned to Lexington and had a private practice on East Third Street and also took on patients of Dr. Bush Hunter who had become ill. Dr. James W. Hammons treated patients of all races. He was the first osteopathic doctor in the country to belong to a medical association in 1969. Gaining membership had been a challenge that became a success with the assistance of many of his comrades in the Fayette County Medical Society. Dr. James W. Hammons was the nephew of Dr. John Matthew Hammons who was the director of the Vernereal Clinic and head of the first Birth Control Clinic for African American women in Louisville, KY. Dr. James W. Hammons' ancestors included both African American slaves and slave owners. For more listen to the James W. Hammons oral history interviews at the University of Kentucky Special Collections, Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History; see J. Ogawa, "Physician James Hammons dies," Lexington Herald-Leader, 08/12/2006, p.B4; J. Warren, "One patient at a time - Lexington osteopath has broken barriers for years," Lexington Herald-Leader, 02/10/2002, p.B1; and D. Burdette, "36-years later, doctor still makes house calls for one special patient," Lexington Herald-Leader, 04/03/1995, p.B1.

 

Access Interview Listen to the recording and read about the James W. Hammons oral history interviews available at the University of Kentucky Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, item records in the SPOKE Database.       

 

 
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Medical Field, Health Care, Hospitals and Clinics: Employment, Founders, Ownership, Incidents, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky / Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky

Haskins, Ovan
Birth Year : 1895
Death Year : 1986
In 1948, Ovan Haskins purchased land on Newtown Pike in Lexington, KY, for the development of the city's first African American subdivision. The subdivision, approved in 1949, was financed with private capital. The construction of homes began in 1950, and the subdivision was located on a single street named Haskins Drive [a dead end street]. There were to be 26 homes; all but four of the 55'x95' lots had been sold by August 1950. Ovan Haskins was born in Lexington, KY; he was an insurance supervisor and manager and a real estate broker. As a member of the Blue Grass Athletic Club, he helped found the Lexington Hustlers baseball team. He also helped found the Second Street YMCA in Lexington and served with the Lexington Human Rights Commission. A picture of one of the newly constructed homes on Haskins Drive is on p. 74 in Lexington, Kentucky, by G. Smith. The Ovan Haskins Oral History interview is available at the UK Libraries' Special Collections as part of the Blacks in Lexington Oral History Project. For more see J. Hewlett, "Former developer Ovan Haskins dies," Lexington Herald-Leader, 07/23/1986, p. B11; "New subdivision for Negroes," Herald-Leader, 05/13/1951, p. 47; and the following articles from the Lexington Leader: "Haskins subdivision groundbreaking," 05/19/1950, p. 25; "Construction started in Haskins addition," 08/07/1950, p. 14; and "Negro subdivision off Newtown Pike begins," 08/22/1950, p. 13.

Access Interview Read about the Ovan Haskins oral history interview available at the University of Kentucky Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, item record in the SPOKE Database.
 
Subjects: Baseball, Insurance Companies, Insurance Sales, Realtors, Real Estate Brokers, Real Estate Investments, YMCA (Young Men's Christian Association), Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky

Johnson, John J.
Birth Year : 1945
From Franklin, KY, John J. Johnson became the youngest NAACP chapter president in Kentucky at the age of 17. During his tenure, the Franklin Chapter of the NAACP prevented the town of Franklin from employing the former chief of police from Philadelphia, Mississippi, where three civil rights workers were murdered. Johnson was state president of the NAACP for 14 years, leaving Kentucky to join the national NAACP office. John Johnson Street in Franklin, KY, is named in his honor. Johnson was born in Louisville, KY, grew up in Franklin, and lived in Baltimore, MD. In 2007, Johnson became the executive director of the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights. For more information, see Hall of Fame 2005 on the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights website; the John J. Johnson Biography at the HistoryMakers website; and KET's "Connections with Renee Shaw" - #312: John J. Johnson.

  See John J. Johnson at the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame website

 

Access InterviewRead more about the John J. Johnson recordings available at the University of Kentucky Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, item records in the SPOKE Database.      
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky / Franklin, Simpson County, Kentucky / Baltimore, Maryland

Johnson, Thelma Banks
Birth Year : 1909
The first African American elected official in Henderson County was Thelma Johnson, she was elected to the Henderson County Board of Education in 1978 and served until 1986. She also served as chair of the Henderson Human Rights Commission. Johnson was born in Georgia, the daughter of Mary and Harry Banks, and she came to Henderson, KY, in 1946.

Access Interview Read the transcript to the Thelma Johnson oral history interview in the Kentucky Historical Society, Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky Oral History Project.
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Politicians, Politics, Appointments & Elections, Board of Education, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Georgia / Henderson, Henderson County, Kentucky

Jones, LeTonia A.
Birth Year : 1972
The following information comes from the biography of LeTonia A. Jones with permission. ~ In 2014, LeTonia A. Jones was a District 8 candidate on the ballot for City Council in Lexington, KY. She was one of two African American women to ever have been on the ballot for City Council in Lexington. She was also the first out LGBT person of color on the ballot. Jones is a community service and social justice advocate, and an advocate to end violence against women and girls. LeTonia A. Jones was born in Paducah, KY and has been living in Lexington since 1994. She is a 1997 graduate of the University of Kentucky with a B.A. in psychology, and earned an M.A. in social work in 2004. For 16 years she was an anti-intimate partner violence advocate. She is currently self-employed as a mitigation specialist and anti-intimate partner violence consultant. In 2013, Lexington Mayor Jim Gray appointed LeTonia A. Jones to the Lexington Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission, and she presently serves as the Commission Chair. ~ LeTonia Jones, A. J. Pritchard, and C. E. Jordan are authors of the article "A Qualitative comparison of battered women’s perceptions of service needs and barriers across correctional and shelter contexts," Criminal Justice and Behavior, July 2014, vol.41, no.7, pp.844-861. 

  

  See LeTonia Jones in the video recording titled Domestic Violence (#608), aired 10/22/2010 on "Connections with Renee Shaw" - Kentucky Educational Television (KET). 

 

   See LeTonia Jones in the video recording titled Domestic Violence (#709), aired 10/28/2011 on "Connections with Renee Shaw" - Kentucky Educational Television (KET).

 

   See LeTonia Jones in the video The Fierceness of Forgiveness, Part I, 07/03/2013, interviewer Amy Lombardo.

 
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Politicians, Politics, Appointments & Elections, Social Workers, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, ..., Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Paducah, McCracken County, Kentucky / Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky

Jones, Louis Clayton
Birth Year : 1935
Death Year : 2006
Jones, an equal rights advocate and international lawyer, was born in Lexington, KY. He was a graduate of old Dunbar High School, Howard University, and Yale Law School, and was admitted to the bar in Kentucky and New York. He founded the National Conference of Black Lawyers. He was assistant director of the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights in 1961. In 1981, he was the Minister of Justice of the Republic of Liberia, returning to the U.S. in 1982. The following year, Jones became counsel to the family of Michael Stewart, a 25-year old New Yorker who was arrested for writing graffiti in the subway and later died from injuries he received while in police custody. In 1985, Jones became the Director of Legal and Financial Affairs in Paris, France, for the Saudi Arabian company First Investment Capital Corporation. Louis Clayton Jones was the son of the late Mary Elizabeth Jones and Rev. William A. Jones, Sr.,; one of his six siblings was Rev. William A. Jones, Jr. For more see J. Ogawa, "Lexington native worked behind scenes for equal rights," Lexington Herald-Leader, 01/13/2006, City&Region section, p. D3; and "RIP: Louis Clayton Jones," Black Star News, 01/12/2006.
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Lawyers, Liberia, Liberian Presidents & Diplomats, Migration North, Migration Outside the U.S. and Canada, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky / New York / Liberia, Africa

Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame Oral History Project
Start Year : 2013
The following comes from the University of Kentucky Public Relations press release, dated March 5, 2014. "The Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame Oral History Project is being made possible by a partnership between UK Libraries' Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the UK Office of Community Engagement and the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights. The commission established the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame to recognize men and women who are or have been leaders in the struggle for equality and justice in the Commonwealth; to raise public awareness about human rights issues; and to foster an environment for discussion and education regarding Kentucky civil rights history and ongoing challenges."

 

Access Interview See the list of names and listen to the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame Oral History interviews available at the University of Kentucky Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, item records are in the SPOKE Database.
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Oral History Collections, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Kentucky

Kentucky Directory of Black Elected Officials
Start Year : 1969
The first issue of the Kentucky Directory of Black Elected Officials was published in 1969 by the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights. Issues are available at the University of Kentucky Libraries.
Subjects: Directories, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Kentucky

McKinney, James O.
Birth Year : 1916
Death Year : 2008
McKinney was appointed to the Auburn, KY, City Council in June 1971 and was the first African American elected official in the city. For 43 years he was pastor of Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Russellville, KY, retiring in 2007. McKinney was born in Sugar Grove, KY, the son of Eliza Beason McKinney and Benjamin R. McKinney. He served as president of the NAACP and Human Rights in Logan County. For more see "36 city officials include mayor, police court judge," in Kentucky Directory of Black Elected Officials [1972], by the Commission on Human Rights, p. 10; McKinney in "Church News," Daily News (Bowling Green, KY), 03/16/2007, Feature section; and "The Rev. James O. McKinney," Daily News, 04/25/2008 & 04/27/2008, Obituaries section.
Subjects: First City Employees & Officials (1960s Civil Rights Campaign), Kentucky African American Churches, Ministers, Pastors, Preachers, Religion & Church Work, NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Sugar Grove, Warren County, Kentucky / Auburn, Simpson County, Kentucky / Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky

Mullins, Pamela
Birth Year : 1953
Pamela Mullins, of Covington, KY, was one of the first inductees to the Holmes [High School] Hall of Distinction for 2000-2001. In 2007, she was inducted into the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights Hall of Fame. Until Paul Mullins election in 2007, Mullins had been the last African American elected to the School Board in Covington; she served from 1990-1997 and resigned to become the first African American woman to be elected to the Covington City Commission. She brought forward the ordinance that created the Covington Human Rights Commission. Pamela Mullins is the daughter of the late Robert Mullins, who was a tenor in the "Northern Kentucky Brotherhood Singers," a male quintet that sings spirituals and gospel music. Pamela Mullins is also the mother of Paul Mullins, the second African American elected to the Covington School Board in 2007. A controversy clouded his election, but Paul Mullins was allowed to remain on the school board until a final decision was made: he was a school employee, a bus driver, when he won the election. Pamela Mullins would go on to become the Covington Human Rights Commissioner. For more see Pamela Mullins in the 2007 Hall of Fame at the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights website; and T. O'Neill, "Mullins defends his right to serve," The Kentucky Post, 03/28/2007, News section, p. A2.




Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Mothers, Politicians, Politics, Appointments & Elections, Board of Education, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Covington, Kenton County, Kentucky

Randolph, Alma L.
Birth Year : 1957
Born in Beaver Dam, KY, Alma Randolph was the first African American woman elected to the Beaver Dam Council (1980) and the first African American to hold office in the county. Randolph is also a gospel singer locally and nationally. In 1993, she founded the Alma Randolph Charitable Foundation, which buys school supplies and back-to-school clothing for disadvantaged children. She is the Human Rights/Community Relations Specialist for Owensboro and in 2007 was appointed to the state Human Rights Commission by then Governor Ernie Fletcher. For more see Women in Kentucky Reform; and KET's "Connections with Renee Shaw" - #308: Alma Randolph.

 
Subjects: Civic Leaders, Musicians, Opera, Singers, Song Writers, Politicians, Politics, Appointments & Elections, Appointments by Kentucky Governors, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Beaver Dam, Ohio County, Kentucky / Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky

Stanley, Frank L., Sr.
Birth Year : 1906
Death Year : 1974
Frank L. Stanley, Sr. was senior editor and publisher of the Louisville Defender newspaper for 38 years. He was also a civil rights activist: in 1950 he drafted Senate Resolution no. 53, which led to the integration of higher education in Kentucky; and he pushed for the organization of the Kentucky Human Rights Commission. In 1962, Stanley was one of the four journalist the State Department sent to African to conduct a journalism seminar for African editors and radio program directors. In 1974, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree by the University of Kentucky during the commencement exercise; Stanley was a  member of the group that fought to desegregate the University of Kentucky. Frank L. Stanley, Sr. was the father of Frank L. Stanley, Jr. In 1983, Frank L. Stanley, Sr. was inducted into the University of Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame. The Frank L. Stanley Papers are at the University of Louisville Libraries' Special Collections and Archives. For more see Biography Index: A cumulative index to biographical material in books and magazines. vol. 10: Sept. 1973-Aug. 1976; "Editor gets honorary doctorate degree," Chicago Metro News, 06/08/1974, p.14; and Who's Who in Colored America, 1950.

See photo image of Frank L. Stanley at the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights, Great Black Kentuckians.
Subjects: Activists, Civil Rights, Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

"The State of African Americans in Kentucky"
Start Year : 2009
The State of African Americans in Kentucky is an online publication (.pdf) by the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights. The report was published in February 2009.
Subjects: Resources Dedicated to Kentucky African Americans [Statewide], Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Kentucky

"The Status of African Americans in Kentucky, 2010 Revised Edition"
Start Year : 2010
Produced by the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights, The Status of African Americans in Kentucky, gives a very good review and overview, and an update on the standing of African Americans in Kentucky. The publication is available online in .pdf.
Subjects: Resources Dedicated to Kentucky African Americans [Statewide], Kentucky Commission on Human Rights
Geographic Region: Kentucky

 

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