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<Kentucky Land Grants>

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Barren County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Barren County is located in south-central Kentucky, surrounded by six other counties. The county was established in 1798 from parts of Warren and Green Counties. It was named for the meadowlands known as the barrens. Many of the early white settlers were veterans of the Revolutionary War who had received land grants in Barren County as payment for their military services. The county had a large number of Scottish families, which was a major influence in the naming of the county seat, Glasgow. There was a total of 4,784 persons counted in Barren County in the Second Census of Kentucky 1800: 4,279 whites and 505 slaves. In 1830 there was one African American slave owner in Barren County. By 1850, there was a population of 15,657, excluding slaves, according to the U.S. Federal Census. Below are the figures for the slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes in the county from 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 944 slave owners
  • 3,921 Black slaves
  • 628 Mulatto slaves
  • 63 free Blacks
  • 1 free Colored [Turnedo Bass born in Mexico]
  • 49 free Mulattoes

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 729 slave owners
  • 3,649 Black slaves
  • 421 Mulatto slaves
  • 37 free Blacks
  • 10 free Mulattoes

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 3,152 Blacks
  • 375 Mulattoes
  • About 68 U.S. Colored Troops listed Barren County, KY, as their birth location.

For more see the Barren County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; Heart of the Barrens, by C. E. Goode; Barren County, Kentucky: African-American Male Marriage Index Book, by M. B. Gorin; Barren's Black Roots, by M. B. Gorin; and Ralph Bunche National Historic District - Oral History Project (FA 457), at Western Kentucky University, Manuscripts and Folklife Archives.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county A-C], Kentucky Land Grants
Geographic Region: Barren County, Kentucky

Fulton County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Fulton County, located in southwestern Kentucky, was formed from a portion of Hickman County in 1845. The county is bordered by one Kentucky county, the Mississippi River on the west side, and the state of Tennessee on the south side. The county was named for Robert Fulton [online biography]. Fulton, from Pennsylvania, was an engineer and developed the first commercially successful steamboat, and an enhanced steam warship and submarine. There are many places in the United States named for Robert Fulton. The county seat of Fulton County, KY is Hickman, which was previously named Mills Point in honor of James Mills who settled in the area on a military grant. The town was renamed to Hickman in 1837, in honor of Mrs. G. W. L. Marr (her maiden name was Hickman); Mr. Marr had owned the town site. The 1850 county population was 3,503, and increased to 4,239 in 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 209 slave owners
  • 751 Black slaves
  • 192 Mulatto slaves
  • 4 free Blacks
  • 0 free Mulattoes
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 216 slave owners
  • 901 Black slaves
  • 141 Mulatto Slaves
  • 16 free Blacks
  • 3 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 824 Blacks
  • 113 Mulattoes
  • About 8 U.S. Colored Troops listed Fulton County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see the Fulton County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; Declaration of Marriage of Negroes and Mulattoes, the Commonwealth of Kentucky, 12 May 1866 to 2 April 1874 by M. H. Adams; Fulton County, Kentucky: histories and biographies by L. Collins and W. H. Perrin; and Fulton by E. R. Jones.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county D-J], Kentucky Land Grants
Geographic Region: Fulton County, Kentucky

Hopkins County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Hopkins County, located in western Kentucky and surrounded by five counties, was created in 1806 from a portion of Henderson County. It was named for Samuel Hopkins, a lawyer, Kentucky Senator, and Revolutionary War veteran; several of the early settlers in the Hopkins County area were Revolutionary War veterans who had received land grants from Virginia. Madisonville, which became the county seat of Hopkins County in 1808, was named for James Madison, who later became the fourth President of the United States. During the early 1800s, there was also a community named Charleston in Hopkins County; it was named for a former slave and tavern owner named Free Charles. The Hopkins County population was 414 [heads of households] in the 1810 U.S. Federal Census, and it grew to 9,866 by 1860, excluding slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks and Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 555 slave owners
  • 1,815 Black slaves
  • 335 Mulatto slaves
  • 16 free Blacks [most with last name Herrin]
  • 34 free Mulattoes [most with last names Earle, Lewis, and Oakley]
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 457 slave owners
  • 1,451 Black slaves
  • 557 Mulatto slaves
  • 10 free Blacks
  • 20 freee Mulattoes [many with last names Baker and Fisher]
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1,458 Blacks
  • 340 Mulattoes
  • About 83 U.S. Colored Troops listed Hopkins County, KY, as their birth location.
1880 U.S. Federal Census
  • Charleston, Hopkins County, Kentucky: 41 African Americans, many with last name Metcalf; and 16 Mulattoes with the last names Bishop, Morris, Paravel, and one Smouthers. Total population 1,575. According to the title Kentucky Place Names, by R. N. Rennick, (p. 56), there was a post office in Charleston from 1855-1909 and a coal loading station that was on the Illinois Central Railroad line.
For more see the Hopkins County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; Non-White Marriage Index 1866-1914, by the Hopkins County Genealogical Society (KY); NAACP Administrative File, Part 20, White resistance and reprisals, 1956-1965; and History of Hopkins County, by M. K. Gordon.
Subjects: Communities, Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county D-J], Kentucky Land Grants
Geographic Region: Hopkins County, Kentucky

Kentucky Land Grants, African Americans
Start Year : 1782
End Year : 1924
The Commonwealth of Virginia issued land grants to settlers in the western Virgina area that is today known as Kentucky. The land was transferred to individuals through a process called patenting, and the final document of purchase was the patent deed. The Virginia series of the Kentucky land grants were issued before 1792. After Kentucky became a state, June 1, 1792, the land grants were issued in the Old Kentucky series by the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Land warrants included treasury, state, county, and military warrants issued to soldiers as payment for service in the French-Indian War and the American Revolutionary War. There were a few free African Americans who owned patent deeds, such as Free Frank who had 50-200 acres in Pulaski County from 1826-1827, Free Jack with 8 acres in Pulaski County in 1856, and Colored Man Jim with 17 acres in Taylor County in 1858. For more see Kentucky Land Grants by W. R. Jillson; and see Kentucky Land and Property, a FamilySearch website. Contact the Kentucky Land Office / 700 Capital Ave., Ste. 80 / Frankfort, KY 40601 / (502) 564-3490.
Subjects: Freedom, Kentucky Land Grants
Geographic Region: Kentucky / Pulaski County, Kentucky / Taylor County, Kentucky

Lyon County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1860-1880
Start Year : 1860
End Year : 1880
Lyon County, located in western Kentucky, was formed in 1854 from a portion of Caldwell County and is bordered by five counties. It was named for Chittenden Lyon, who was born in Vermont and came to Kentucky when he was a child. He was a Kentucky Representative and Senator, and a U.S. Representative. The county seat of Lyon County is Eddyville, which was established in 1798 by David Walker, a Revolutionary War veteran who had received a land grant. The town was named for the eddies in the nearby stream. Eddyville was first established as the seat of Livingston County in 1799, and was later the seat of Caldwell County, before being named the seat of Lyon County in 1854. The 1860 county population was 4,214, according to the U.S. Federal Census, excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, and free Blacks and Mulattoes for 1860-1880.

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 195 slave owners
  • 902 Black slaves
  • 195 Mulatto slaves
  • 34 free Blacks
  • 10 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1,306 Blacks
  • 118 Mulattoes
  • About 85 U.S. Colored Troops listed Lyon County, KY, as their birth location.
1880 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1,102 Blacks
  • 390 Mulattoes
For more see the Lyon County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; Predestinarian Baptist Church Records, 1865-1891 from Predestinarian Baptist Church (Lyon County, Ky.); Marriage Books (indexed), 1854-1987 from Lyon County (Ky.). County Clerk; and Tax Assessment Books, 1863-1911 from Lyon County (Ky.). County Clerk.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M], Kentucky Land Grants
Geographic Region: Lyon County, Kentucky

Washington County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Washington County, located in central Kentucky where it is bordered by six counties, was the 10th county formed in Kentucky, in 1792. It was named for President George Washington. Many of the first settlers were veterans who came to the area to claim land grants awarded to them for service during the American Revolutionary War. The county seat, Springfield, was founded in 1793 and named for the many springs in the area. In 1800, the total population was 9,050: 7,611 whites, 17 free coloreds, and 1,422 slaves, according to the Second Census of Kentucky, 1800. In 1830 there were two free African American slave owners in Springfield. By 1860, the total population was 8,753, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 608 slave owners
  • 3,127 Black slaves
  • 337 Mulatto slaves
  • 48 free Blacks
  • 15 free Mulattoes
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 450 slave owners
  • 2,149 Black slaves
  • 674 Mulatto slaves
  • 32 free Blacks
  • 14 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1,783 Blacks
  • 312 Mulattoes
  • About 25 U.S. Colored Troops listed Washington County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see the Washington County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; 1792 Tax List of Washington County, Kentucky; Marriage Bond Books, (1858-1942) at the Washington County Clerk's office; Marriages of Black Residents of Washington County, Kentucky Back Dated and Recorded, 1866-1872, by L. A. Anderson; I Shared the Dream, by G. D. Powers; and Washington County, Kentucky, St. Rose Cemetery, and other "tidbits", by D. F. Bertram.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county N-Z], Kentucky Land Grants
Geographic Region: Washington County, Kentucky

 

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