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<Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers>

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Among the Colored Citizens (Frankfort Newspaper)
Start Year : 1883
End Year : 1892
As early as February 17, 1883, The Frankfort Roundabout newspaper had a column titled "Colored Department" on p.4. "[Under this head we will publish weekly items of interest to our colored citizens.]" The column fell to the wayside until about 1886-1890s when it was titled "Among the Colored People," then changed to "Among the Colored Citizens." The column was initially located on the front page, but was later moved to the latter pages. The content included news of visitors and vacations, church news, deaths, entertainment, and graduations. The full text of the columns is available online within the Kentucky Digital Library - Newspapers and Chronicling America.
Subjects: Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky

Colored Circles and Colored Notes (Lexington Newspapers)
Start Year : 1898
End Year : 1969
"Colored Notes," a column found in mainstream newspapers throughout the United States, contained information about African Americans; the column was often located on the back pages next to the want ads. The articles ranged in length from a few sentences to an entire column or more. The term "Colored Circles" was used in the late 1890s in the Daily Leader, and predated the use of the term "Colored Notes" in the Lexington Leader beginning around 1904. "Colored Notes" had been a part of the Lexington Herald since 1921, and the merged publication the Sunday Herald-Leader. In the late 1950s, rumblings of opposition arose toward the use of the term "Colored" and the segregating of news in the Lexington newspapers. In the early 1960s, CORE and other civil rights organizations demanded that the notation "Colored Notes" be removed and that news about African Americans be incorporated with all other news. On the opposing side, there was a push by some to keep the news separate, including African Americans who felt that if "Colored Notes" disappeared, then journalism would return to the days when there was no news at all about African Americans in the mainstream newspapers. The Lexington newspapers were not inclined to remove "Colored Notes," so the heated debate continued. Finally, a readership vote was solicited in 1964, and it was reported that the final tally showed that readers wanted "Colored Notes" to continue. It would take another five years of disagreement before the newspapers begrudgingly relented, and the term and the segregation of the African American news within "Colored Notes" was discontinued in the Lexington newspapers. For more see "Colored Circles," Daily Leader, 02/07/1898, p.2; "Colored Notes," Lexington Leader, 03/04/1904, p.7; "The Lexington, Ky., Herald has added a column of "Colored News Notes" to its edition," The Crisis, July 1921, vol.22, issue 3, p.130; "Colored Notes," Lexington Leader, 04/22/1940, p.10; "Colored Notes and Obituaries," Lexington Herald-Leader, 01/12/1964, p. 9; and "Colored Notes to be eliminated," Lexington Herald-Leader, 02/01/1969, p. 22.
Subjects: Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, CORE (Congress of Racial Equality), Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky

Colored Column (Winchester Newspaper)
Start Year : 1908
End Year : 1912
The Winchester News began publishing in 1908, which was the same year that the newspaper included the "Colored Column." The column initially consisted of one paragraph, but soon grew in length and included news about African Americans in Winchester, as well as those in other Kentucky cities and the national news. The newspaper was sold in 1912 and the name changed to Winchester Sun. Full text of the "Colored Column" is available in the Winchester News for the years 1908-1910 in the Kentucky Digital Library - Newspapers and in Chronicling America. For a history of the newspaper, see Winchester News, a Kentucky Digital Library website.
Subjects: Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Winchester, Clark County, Kentucky

Colored Department (Paducah Newspaper)
Start Year : 1896
End Year : 1898
In 1896, the Paducah Daily Sun newspaper was purchased by Frank M. Fisher and a new column, "Colored Department," was added. The column included items such as births, church news, and masonic lodge news. In 1897, the submitted information for the column was to be left at the store of J. W. Moore, and from there it would be delivered to the newspaper [source: Paducah Daily Sun, 01/09/1897, p. 3]. By November of 1897, the submitted items could be left with C. W. Merriweather at 221 S. 7th Street in Paducah; Merriweather would take the information to the newspaper [source: Paducah Daily Sun, 11/10/1897, p. 3]. The "Colored Department column" can be read online in the 1896 issues of the Paducah Daily Sun newspaper within the Kentucky Digital Library - Newspapers. Other issues that include the column from 1896-1898 are available online at Chronicling America. In 1898 the Colored Department column ceased to be published; owner Frank M. Fisher merged the Paducah Daily Sun with the Weekly Sun, resulting in the Paducah Sun [source: About Paducah Sun at the Chronicling America website].
Subjects: Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Paducah, McCracken County, Kentucky

Colored News (Berea newspaper)
Start Year : 1913
End Year : 1913
The "Colored News" column ran for a few issues in 1913 in Berea, KY's Citizen newspaper. The Citizen, founded in 1899, was sponsored by Berea College. The paper was initially a recruitment tool for white students. See "Colored News," Citizen, 08/28/1913, p. 4; 09/11/1913, p. 4; and 12/11/1913, p. 4. Available online, 1899-1920, at Kentucky Digital Library - Newspapers and Chronicling America.
Subjects: Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Berea, Madison County, Kentucky

Colored News (Middlesboro newspaper)
Start Year : 1933
End Year : 1950
The "Colored Notes" column was printed in the Middlesboro Daily News on August 27, 1931, p. 4. Two years later, the "Colored News" column was printed in the same newspaper and continued until 1950. The column contained news about African Americans in Middlesboro, KY. The newspaper was first published in 1920; the name was changed in 1981 to Daily News. See "Colored Notes," Middlesboro Daily News, 08/27/1931, p. 4; and "Colored News," in issues of the Middlesboro Daily News from 07/01/1933, p. 3, to 08/16/1950, p. 8.
Subjects: Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Middlesboro, Bell County, Kentucky

Colored Notes (Mt. Stering Newspaper)
Start Year : 1918
In October of 1918, Robin Hamilton was the writer for "Colored Notes" in the Mt. Sterling Advocate newspaper. By November, between each item of the column was an ad for hats and clothing. The column was still being published in 1922. The Mt. Sterling Advocate was first published as a weekly paper in 1890, founded by John H. Mason and Dr. C. W. Harris. The paper is still in print today. See "Colored Notes," Mt. Sterling Advocate, 11/12/1918, p.8 and later issues. Available online full text, 1891-1922, at Chronicling America and Kentucky Digital Library - Newspapers.
Subjects: Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Mount Sterling, Montgomery County, Kentucky

Colored People's Column, and Colored News (Earlington Newspaper)
Start Year : 1893
Almost from the beginning, a Colored news column appeared in The Bee, a semi-weekly Republican newspaper in the mining town of Earlington, KY. The newspaper was first published in 1889, and the column, "Colored People's Column," appeared as early as 1893, and "Our Colored Citizens," appeared in 1900. By 1902, it was named "News for the Colored People" written by Reverend J. H. Gough. The column was limited to 1,000 words and the coverage area included Earlington, Mortons Gap, and Hecla, KY. African American readers were encouraged to subscribe to The Bee. The column was to appear in each newspaper issue, but would be omitted if space was needed for other news. Around 1903, the column was headed "Colored News" or "Colored Column" until it was finally decided that "Colored News" would be the heading. The Bee existed for almost 50 years, and "Colored News" can be found on the latter pages of most issues. Full text of the newspaper is available for the years 1898-1910 at Kentucky Digital Library and Chronicling America. For more about the history of the newspaper, see The Bee, a Kentucky Digital Library website.
Subjects: Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Earlington, Mortons Gap, and Hecla, all in Hopkins County, Kentucky

Morbley, Gertrude Mae Nero
Birth Year : 1918
Death Year : 1988
Gertrude M. Morbley was the "Colored Notes" writer for the Lexington Herald-Leader from 1962 until the column was abolished in 1969. Morbley was 18 years old when she was hired in May of 1937 as the elevator operator at the old newspaper building on Short Street in Lexington, KY. Her move to the "Colored Notes" column came after an automatic elevator was installed, and by that time, Morbley had learned much about the newspaper business. When the "Colored Notes" column ended in 1969, Morbley moved to the accounting department. In total, Gertrude M. Morbley was employed at the Lexington Herald-Leader for 44 years. Her employment is one of the longest in the history of the newspaper. She was also a member and past Grand Matron of the Dorcas Chapter No. 29 of the Order of the Eastern Star. She was the wife of Cornelius Morbley. Gertrude M. Morbley was born October 28, 1918, in Lexington, KY, the daughter of Elijah and Eva Haggard Nero [source: 1920 U.S. Federal Census; and Kentucky Birth Index]. [Elijah Nero was a jockey and horse trainer.] For more see J. Hewlett, "Gertrude Mae Morbley, Herald-Leader worker for four decades, dies," Lexington Herald-Leader, 03/23/1988, p. B7.

See photo image of Gertrude M. Morbley in the online display of the 2013 Black History Month exhibit in UKnowledge.
Subjects: Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, Women's Groups and Organizations, Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky

Our Colored Citizens (Maysville newspaper)
Start Year : 1900
End Year : 1915
About the middle of December, 1900, the Daily Public Ledger newspaper in Maysville, KY, had a column entitled "Our Colored Citizens." The column was dedicated to brief notes about African Americans in the city. On page one of the December 15, 1900, issue is a request for submissions; the first sentence of the column reads, "Send in news if you want it printed." The column can be found on any of the four pages of the various newspaper issues, and in the last available papers, published in 1912, the column was still called "Our Colored Citizens." The Daily Public Ledger was a four-page Republican newspaper that was founded in 1892. Thomas A. Davis was one of the eight original owners, and he would become the sole owner until 1907, when the paper was sold to Arthur F. Curran [sources: Chronicling America information website and A History of Kentucky and Kentuckians, vol. 3, by E. P. Johnson]. In 1912, Daily Public Ledger was changed to Public Ledger, and the column "Our Colored Citizens" was continued in the retitled newspaper at least through December of 1915. Issues of the Daily Public Ledger and Public Ledger are available online at Kentucky Digital Library - Newspapers. Issues of the Daily Public Ledger are also available at Chronicling America.
Subjects: Journalists, Newspapers, Magazines, Book Publishers, Music Publishers, Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers
Geographic Region: Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

 

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