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<Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]>

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African American Slave Owners in Kentucky
Start Year : 1830
In 1924 the Research Department of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History completed a study of the free Negro slave owners found in the 1830 U. S. Federal Census. The study found that there were 3,777 Negro slave owners in the United States. Negro slave owners were listed in 29 Kentucky counties (see below). Ownership may have meant the purchase of a spouse, an individual's children, or other relatives who were not emancipated. Ownership was also an investment: purchased children and adults may or may not have been given the opportunity to work off their purchase price in exchange for their freedom. A History of World Societies documents a total of 6,000 Negro slave owners in the U.S. for the year 1840 [p. 846]. The 1850 and 1860 Slave Schedules do not identify slave owners by race; the individual names of slave owners must be searched in the U.S. Federal Census to identify the individual's race. For more see the Research Department's article, "Free Negro owners of slaves in the United States in 1830," The Journal of Negro History, vol. 9, no. 1 (Jan., 1924), pp. 41-85; A History of World Societies, by J. P. McKay, et al. [2006]; and A History of Blacks in Kentucky, by M. B. Lucas.

Kentucky Counties with Negro Slave Owners in 1830
[book source: Free Negro Owners of Slaves in the United States in 1830 compiled and edited by C. G. Woodson, pp.4-6]
 

  1. Adair County (1) - Swaney Burbridge
  2. Barren County (1) - Leander Force
  3. Bourbon County (9) - Peter Allen, Sally Wallace, Isaac Jones, James Monday, Peter Grant, Gabriel, Allen Heathman, Edmon Hurley, Stephen Brooks
  4. Bracken County (1) - Lethia Thomas
  5. Bullitt County, [Mt. Washington] (2) - Isaac Ellison, Bash Oldridge
  6. Christian County, [Hopkinsville] (1) - Michael Cocke
  7. Clark County (2) - John Dudley, George Birth
  8. Fayette County (13), [Lexington] (15) - Nancy Scott, Peter Whiting, Robert Gray, Charlotte Lewis, Richard Bird, William Tucker, Jesse Smith, Nathan Keifer, Benjamin Tibbs, Jane Brittain, Hannah Travis, Wittshire Brackenridge, Harvey Phillips, Frank Lee, Nicholas Black -- Peter Davis, Adam B. Martin, Isaac Howard, William Burk, Benjamin Caulden, Peter Francess, Ben Williams, Anaka Shores, Jer'y Allen, Alexander Allen, Samuel Dunlap, Rhody Clark, Robert Smith
  9. Fleming County (1) - Jacob Truett
  10. Franklin County, [Frankfort] (6) - Harry Mordecai, David Jones, John Ward, Burrel Chiles, John S. Goin, Samuel Brown
  11. Graves County (1) - Alias Keeling
  12. Green County (1) - Thomas Malone
  13. Harrison County (1) - Benjamin Berton
  14. Henderson County (1) - Liverpool Pointer
  15. Jefferson County (1), [Louisville] (5) - J. T. Gray -- Betty Cozzens, David Straws, Frank Merriwether, Daniel Brigadier, Sally
  16. Jessamine County (3) - Judith Higenbothan, Anthony of colour, William a man of color
  17. Knox County (1) - Isaiah Goins
  18. Logan County, [Russellville] (5) - Nicholas Valentine, Robert Buckner, Edward Jones, Isham Husketh, William Barber
  19. Madison County (1) - George White
  20. Mason County (9), [Washington] (3) - Thomas F. Bowles, John Glasford, Edward Cooper, H. Markham, Roseann Wann, Charles More, Ann Baylor, Edmond Toliver, Acam Diggs -- Peggy Miles, John Lightfoot, Isaac Johnson
  21. Mercer County (9) - Anderson Harris, Ben Harris, Spencer Easton, Fielding Melvin, Jemima Fry, Hercules Jenkins, George Warman, Adam Beaty, Sanko Robinson
  22. Montgomery County (1) - Richard Lee
  23. Nelson County, [Bardstown] (4) - Thomas Smiley, Joe Cocke, Thomas Rudd, George Aud
  24. Nicholas County (1) - George Mallery
  25. Rockcastle County (1) - David Cable
  26. Shelby County (1), [Shelbyville] (3) - John Edwards -- Peter Short, Hannah Harris, Jim Henson
  27. Warren County (2) - Jane Palmore, Bazzle Russell
  28. Washington County, [Springfield] (2) - Robert C. Palmer, Ignatius Sandy
  29. Woodford County (13) - Joe Miller, Lawrence Corbin, Betty Tutt, Billy Campbell, Henry Mason, Tom Stratford, Ambrose Hardy, Richard Harvey, Samuel Cloak, Nathan Twiner, Joel Hawkins, Moses Weaver, Jordan Ritchie

Subjects: Free African American Slave Owners, Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county A-C], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county D-J], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county N-Z]
Geographic Region: Kentucky

Free Blacks, Negroes, and Mulattoes in the 1800 Kentucky Tax Lists
Start Year : 1800
The Second Census of Kentucky 1800 was constructed from the tax lists in the existing Kentucky counties. Below are the names of free Blacks, Negroes and Mulattoes, all taxpayers who were included in the listing. They were among the 739 free Colored persons in Kentucky in 1800. There may have been others named on the lists, but their race was not noted.

  • Robert Anderson, Barren County
  • William Anderson, Barren County
  • John Baker, Nelson County
  • William Blakey, Barren County
  • Abner Bourne, Barren County
  • Peter Brass, Franklin County
  • William Cousins, Nelson County
  • William Daily, Fayette County
  • Isam Davis, Lincoln County
  • Adam Evens, Lincoln County
  • Michael Jackson, Lincoln County
  • Abraham Levaugh, Warren County
  • John Lewis, Jefferson County
  • Bristo Mathews, Lincoln County
  • Edward Mathews, Lincoln County
  • Gloster Rawls, Nelson County
  • George Stafford, Gallatin County
  • Moses Tyre, Bullitt County
  • William Walker, Nelson County

Subjects: Early Settlers, Freedom, Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county A-C], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county D-J], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county N-Z]
Geographic Region: Kentucky Counties: Bullitt, Fayette, Franklin, Gallatin, Jefferson, Lincoln, Nelson, Warren

Kenton County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Kenton County, located in northern Kentucky along the Ohio River, was formed in 1840 from a portion of Campbell County. Kenton County is surrounded by three counties, it was named for frontiersman Simon Kenton, who was a friend of Daniel Boone and a veteran of the Indian Wars and the War of 1812. There are two county seats in Kenton County, Independence and Covington. Independence was incorporated in 1842 and the name is in reference to Kenton County being separated from Campbell County. Covington, originally known as Point, was established in 1815 and named for Leonard Wales Covington, who was killed during the War of 1812. Covington was the second largest city in Kentucky in 1850, and had served as the unofficial county seat until Independence was established in 1842. As Covington continued to grow, it became the center for county business and court matters, and in 1860, the Kentucky Legislature made Covington the second county seat. The 1840 county population was 1,303 [heads of households], according to the U.S. Federal Census, and it grew to 24,861 by 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 298 slave owners
  • 721 Black slaves
  • 109 Mulatto slaves
  • 61 free Blacks
  • 14 free Mulattoes
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 212 slave owners
  • 451 Black slaves
  • 116 Mulatto slaves
  • 58 free Blacks
  • 27 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1,224 Blacks
  • 358 Mulattoes
  • About 27 U.S. Colored Soldiers listed Kenton County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see the Kenton County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; African-American Residents of Kenton County, Kentucky transcribed by T. H. H. Harris; History of Kenton County, Kentucky, in the World War, 1917-1919 by S. D. Rouse; The Evolution of Covington's Black Residential Pattern, 1860-1980 by E. T. Weiss; and A Comparative Study of the Educational Effectiveness of the White and Negro Schools of Covington, Kentucky by W. F. Hargraves. See photo image and history of Kenton County Colored School at Kenton County Public Library website.

Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Kenton County, Kentucky

Kentucky Slaves and Free Blacks, 1800
Start Year : 1800
G. Glen Clift, Assistant Secretary of the Kentucky Historical Society, compiled and published "Second Census" of Kentucky 1800, originally published in Frankfort, KY in 1954. The following quotation is taken from the title page: "A Privately Compiled and Published Enumeration of Tax Payers Appearing in the 79 Manuscript Volumes Extant of Tax Lists of the 42 Counties of Kentucky in Existence in 1800." Within the table on page VI is the following information: 739 free Colored and 40,303 slaves, and there is also a breakdown by county.
Subjects: Early Settlers, Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county A-C], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county D-J], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county N-Z]
Geographic Region: Kentucky

Kentucky Slaves and Free Persons Not White, 1790
Start Year : 1790
In 1790, there were 11,830 slaves and 114 free blacks in the area known as Kentucky, according to the title Black Genesis: A Resource Book for African-American Genealogy, p116. Another source is the "First Census" of Kentucky 1790, compiled by C. B. Heinemann, published in Washington in 1940. The following quote comes from page 1. "It is a privately compiled list of tax payers appearing in the tax lists of all Kentucky counties which were established at the time of the First Federal Census." In Heinemann's work, the number of slaves are slightly higher: 12,430 slaves and 114 free persons who were not white. The following information comes from p.3.

  • Bourbon County:     6,929 whites,   908 slaves,
  • Fayette County:    14,626 whites, 3,752 slaves, 32 free persons
  • Jefferson County:    3,857 whites,    903 slaves,   5 free persons
  • Lincoln County:       5,446 whites, 1,094 slaves,   8 free persons
  • Madison County:     5,035 whites,    737 slaves
  • Mason County:        2,500 whites,    229 slaves
  • Mercer County:        5,745 whites, 1,339 slaves,   7 free persons
  • Nelson County:      10,032 whites, 1,248 slaves, 35 free persons
  • Woodford County:    6,963 whites, 2,220 slaves, 27 free persons


Subjects: Early Settlers, Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county A-C], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county D-J], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county N-Z]

Knott County (KY) Free Blacks and Free Mulattoes, 1900-1920
Start Year : 1900
End Year : 1920
Knott County, located in eastern Kentucky, was formed from portions of Perry, Letcher, Floyd, and Breathitt Counties in 1884. It is surrounded by six counties and was named for Governor James P. Knott, who was also a U.S. Congressman. The county seat is Hindman, founded in 1884, and named for the Lieutenant Governor James P. Hindman. The county population in 1900 was 8,776. Knott County was formed after Kentucky slaves were freed by the ratification of the 13th Amendment; therefore, below are the number of Blacks and Mulattoes for 1900-1920.

1900 U.S. Federal Census

  • 169 Blacks
  • 0 Mulattoes
  • All lived in the community of Carr, Knott County, KY.
1910 U.S. Federal Census
  • 143 Blacks [majority with the last names of Adams, Christian, Combs, Cowles, Francis, Hagans, or Williams]
  • 6 Coloreds [last names Adams, Cowles, Francis, or Williams]
  • 5 Mulattoes [all with last name Hagans]
  • All lived in Lower Carr, Knott County, KY, except two who lived in Troublesome, Knott County, Ky.
1920 U.S. Federal Census
  • 150 Blacks
  • 0 Mulattoes
  • All lived in Lower Carr, Knott County, KY.
  • About 8 Blacks and 2 Coloreds registered for WWI in Knott County, Kentucky.
For more see the Knott County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; History and Families, Knott County, Kentucky, Turner Publishing Company; and Community and Neighborhood Groupings in Knott County by M. D. Oyler.
Subjects: Communities, Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Knott County, Kentucky

Knox County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Knox County, located in southeastern Kentucky, was established in 1799 from a portion of Lincoln County and is surrounded by four counties. The county was named for Henry Knox, a bookseller from, Boston, MA, who would become the first Secretary of War. Knox County industries included mining and and the discovery of oil beginning in 1900. The county seat is Barbourville, established in 1800 and named for James Barbour, who gave the land for the city site. The 1800 county population was 1,109, according to the Second Census of Kentucky; 1,044 whites, 62 slaves, and 3 free coloreds. In 1830 there was one free African American slave owner in Knox County. The population increased to 7,218 by 1860, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 123 slave owners
  • 414 Black slaves
  • 198 Mulatto slaves
  • 56 free Blacks
  • 143 free Mulattoes
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 115 slave owners
  • 311 Black slaves
  • 179 Mulatto slaves
  • 62 free Blacks
  • 123 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 279 Blacks
  • 365 Mulattoes
  • About 40 U.S. Colored Troops listed Knox County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see the Knox County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; A History of Knox County, Kentucky, by K. S. Warren; Marriage Certificate Book (Freemen's Marriage Register), 1851-1867, from Knox County (KY) County Clerk; and Tax Assessment Books (1800-1892), from Knox County (KY) County Clerk.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Knox County, Kentucky

Larue County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Larue County or LaRue County, located in central Kentucky and surrounded by five counties, was created in 1843 from the lower portion of Hardin County. It is named for John LaRue, an early settler who was the grandfather of Kentucky Governor John LaRue Helm. U.S. President Abraham Lincoln was born in Larue County in 1809. There is only one Larue County in the entire United States. The county seat is Hodgenville, named for Robert Hodgen, who was born in England, lived in Pennsylvania, and moved to Kentucky. Hodgenville was created in 1818 on land that had belonged to Robert Hodgen. The 1850 county population was 5,187, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and the population increased to 5,992 in 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks and Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 186 slave owners
  • 508 Black slaves
  • 157 Mulatto slaves
  • 8 free Blacks [most with last name Savoree, while others were surnamed Lovelace, Friend, Clay, and Barritt]
  • 7 free Mulattoes [six with the last name Meredith, plus E. Payton]
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 221 slave owners
  • 604 Black slaves
  • 297 Mulatto slaves
  • 1 free Black [Ruebin Balis, a 50 year old blacksmith]
  • 3 free Mulattoes [2 Savorees, 1 Wright]
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 626 Blacks
  • 327 Mulattoes
  • About 26 U.S. Colored Troops listed Larue County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see the Larue County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; LaRue County, by R. H. Nichols; Common Law Marriages, 1866-1876, Colored, Marriages, 1866-1913, Colored, by R. Heady; and Bond-Washington School, 1924-1956, by B. M. Marcus.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Larue County, Kentucky

Laurel County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Laurel County, located in southeastern Kentucky, was established in 1825 from portions of Clay, Knox, Rockcastle, and Whitley Counties, and is surrounded by seven counties. It is named for the laurel shrub found in the area. The county seat is London, named in 1825 for London, England. The county population was 342 [heads of households] in 1830, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and the population increased to 5,302 by 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, and free Blacks and Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 56 slave owners
  • 141 Black slaves
  • 0 Mulatto slaves
  • 2 free Blacks [Peter Johnathan and Joanna Pin, both born in VA]
  • 6 free Mulattoes [last names Faris, Leckiter, Wiggins]
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 37 slave owners
  • 146 Black slaves
  • 40 Mulatto slaves
  • 0 free Blacks
  • 1 free Mulatto [Wely Young]
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 108 Blacks
  • 31 Mulattoes
  • About 11 U.S. Colored Troops listed Laurel County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see the Laurel County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; Pictorial History of Laurel County, Kentucky, by the Laurel County Historical Society; and Marriage Bond Books (indexed) at Laurel County, KY, County Clerk website. See photo image of the construction of the Negro school in Laurel County in Kentucky Digital Library - images.

Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Laurel County, Kentucky

Lawrence County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Lawrence County was established in 1821 from portions of Greenup and Floyd Counties. It is located in eastern Kentucky, bordered by the state of West Virginia and six Kentucky counties. The county is named for James Lawrence who was born in New Jersey, and was a U.S. naval officer. He commanded the USS Chesapeake during the War of 1812. The county seat of Lawrence County was named Louisa in 1822. The exact origin of the name is not known. The 1830 county population was 618 [heads of households], according to the U.S. Federal Census, and it increased to 7,453 in 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 41 slave owners
  • 105 Black slaves
  • 32 Mulatto slaves
  • 1 free Black [Alim Shaw, born in SC]
  • 1 free Mulatto [George Fugett]
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 38 slave owners
  • 101 Black slaves
  • 45 Mulatto slaves
  • 0 free Blacks
  • 0 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 100 Blacks
  • 22 Mulattoes
  • About 10 U.S. Colored Soldiers listed Lawrence County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see the Lawrence County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; History of Lawrence County, Kentucky by R. Tackett and et. al.; and Collin's Historical Sketches of Kentucky, v.2 by L. Collins and R. H. Collins.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Lawrence County, Kentucky

Lee County (KY) Free Blacks and Free Mulattoes, 1870-1900
Start Year : 1870
End Year : 1900
Lee County, located in eastern Kentucky, was formed in 1870 from portions of Breathitt, Estill, Owsley, and Wolfe Counties. It is surrounded by five counties, and it is uncertain how the county got its name. The county seat is Beattyville, established in 1872 and named for Samuel Beatty who provided the land for the town. Lee County was established after the slaves in Kentucky were freed by the 13th Amendment. Below are the population numbers for African Americans in the county in 1870, 1880, and 1900.

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 95 Blacks
  • 54 Mulattoes
  • About 3 U.S. Colored Troops listed Lee County, KY as their birth location.

1880 U.S. Federal Census

  • 51 Blacks

1900 U.S. Federal Census

  • 273 Blacks

For more see the Lee County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Lee County, Kentucky

Leslie County (KY) Free Blacks and Free Mulattoes, 1880-1910
Start Year : 1880
End Year : 1910
Leslie County was formed in 1878 from portions of Clay, Harlan, and Perry Counties. It is located in southeastern Kentucky in the Eastern Coal Field region and is surrounded by four counties. The county was named for Kentucky Governor Preston H. Leslie, who was later territorial governor of Montana. The county seat is Hyden, named for Kentucky Senator John Hyden. Leslie County was formed after slaves in Kentucky was freed by the 13th Amendment. Below are the number of African Americans in the county in 1880, 1900, and 1910

1880 U.S. Federal Census

  • 11 Blacks [most with last name Walker, 2 Entoush, 1 Dosier, 1 Combs]
  • 11 Colored children [Source: Acts of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, v.1, p.731, Chapter 405, March 17, 1884 - online at Google Book Search]
1900 U.S. Federal Census
  • 76 Blacks
1910 U.S. Federal Census
  • 14 Blacks
  • 4 Colored [Comett, Fuggle, Pennigton, and Rauss]
  • 122 Mulattoes
For more see Leslie County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Leslie County, Kentucky

Letcher County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Letcher County is located in southeastern Kentucky on the West Virginia border, and adjoins four Kentucky counties. It was formed in 1842 from portions of Perry and Harlan Counties, and was named for Governor Robert P. Letcher, who was a Kentucky Representative and was Speaker of the House, and a U.S. Representative. The county seat of Letcher County is Whitesburg, named in 1842 for John D. White, a Kentucky Representative and U.S. Senator. According to the 1850 U.S. Federal Census, the Letcher County population was 2,450, and increased to 4,608 by 1870, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 21 slave owners
  • 51 Black slaves
  • 11 Mulatto slaves
  • 0 free Blacks
  • 9 free Mulattoes [most with last name Moore]
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 29 slave owners
  • 87 Black slaves
  • 21 Mulatto slaves
  • 2 free Blacks [Lucinda Banks and Henry Williams]
  • 5 free Mulattoes [most with last name Moore]
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 110 Blacks
  • 13 Mulattoes
  • 1 U.S. Colored Troop listed Letcher County, KY, as his birth location. [William McKinnevan]
For more see the Letcher County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; Letcher County, Kentucky by W. T. Cornett; Blacks in Appalachia by W. H. Turner and E. J. Cabbell.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Letcher County, Kentucky

Lewis County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Lewis County is located in northeastern Kentucky on the Ohio River and borders five counties. It was developed from a portion of Mason County in 1806, and is named for Merriweather Lewis of the famed Lewis and Clark Expedition. The first county seat was Poplar Flats in 1806, and Vanceburg became the county seat in December of 1863. Vanceburg was named for Joseph C. Vance, a Revolutionary War veteran who was born in Virginia. The 1810 population of Lewis County was 345 [heads of households], according to the U.S. Federal Census, and the population increased to 8,011 by 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 91 slave owners
  • 251 Black slaves
  • 71 Mulatto Slaves
  • 7 free Blacks
  • 1 free Mulatto [Robert McDowell]
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 69 slave owners
  • 134 Black slaves
  • 96 Mulatto Slaves
  • 15 free Blacks [10 with the last name Dennis]
  • 2 free Mulattoes [Jesse Greenway and Menerva Vincent]
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 205 Blacks
  • 30 Mulattoes
  • About 13 U.S. Colored Troops listed Lewis County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see Lewis County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; History of Lewis County, Kentucky by O. G. Ragan; C.B. Shepard Deed of Emancipation, 1826; and Tax Assessment Books, 1807-1911 (Lewis County).
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Lewis County, Kentucky

Lincoln County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Lincoln County was one of the original three counties established by Virginia in 1780 [Fayette and Jefferson were the other two counties]. The three counties were created in order to make it easier for the state of Virginia to govern the huge area previously known as Kentucky County. The present day boundaries of Lincoln County were established in 1843, and it is surrounded by five counties. Lincoln County was named for Benjamin Lincoln, a Revolutionary War general who was captured by the British. Stanford is the county seat, it was founded by Benjamin Logan in 1775; the exact origin of the city name is not known. It was first known as St. Asaph, then Fort Logan. In the First Census of Kentucky, 1970, there were 5,446 whites, 1,094 slaves, and 8 free persons. The 1800 Lincoln County population was 8,621, according to the Second Census of Kentucky; 6,822 whites, 1,776 slaves, and 23 free coloreds. The 1810 population was 8,676, according to the Third Census of the United States, Lincoln County, Kentucky: 6,297 whites, 2,341 slaves, and 38 free colored persons. The 1860 population was 7,177, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes from 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 515 slave owners
  • 2,878 Black slaves
  • 476 Mulatto slaves
  • 65 free Blacks
  • 41 free Mulattoes

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 531 slave owners
  • 2,270 Black slaves
  • 1,159 Mulatto slaves
  • 54 free Blacks
  • 106 free Mulattoes

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 2,072 Blacks
  • 921 Mulattoes
  • About 210 U.S. Colored Troops listed Lincoln County, KY, as their birth location.

For more see the Lincoln County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; Lincoln County, Kentucky by the Lincoln County Historical Society; Slave Records, 1781-1784 of Stephen Trigg; and the Anne Butler audio interview, Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky at the Kentucky Historical Society website. See photo image of Negro High School in Stanford, KY in Kentucky Digital Library - images.

Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Lincoln County, Kentucky

Livingston County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Livingston County, located in southwestern Kentucky, was created in 1798 from a portion of Christian County. It is bordered by the Kentucky River, the Tennessee River, Kentucky Lake, and Lake Barkley, and is adjacent to four counties. The county is named for Robert R. Livingston, who helped draft the Declaration of Independence (but did not sign it), negotiated the Louisiana Purchase, and was a member of the Erie Canal Commission. Eddyville was the first county seat of Livingston County in 1799, then Centerville in 1804, and Salem in 1809. The present county seat, Smithland, named in honor of James Smith of Pennsylvania, was established in 1841. The 1800 county population was 2,856, according to the Second Census of Kentucky: 2,396 whites, 456 slaves, and 4 free coloreds. The 1860 population was 5,983, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 231 slave owners
  • 981 Black slaves
  • 136 Mulatto slaves
  • 28 free Blacks
  • 31 free Mulattoes

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 261 slave owners
  • 999 Black slaves
  • 224 Mulatto slaves
  • 14 free Blacks
  • 13 free Mulattoes

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 600 Blacks
  • 396 Mulattoes
  • About 111 U.S. Colored Troops gave Livingston County, KY, as their birth location.

For more see the Livingston County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; Livingston County, Kentucky by Livingston County Historical and Genealogical Society; Schools. Kentucky, Cowper, C.A. et al. v. Livingston County Board of Education, 1941-42, Papers of the NAACP; and Marriage Bond Books (indexed), Livingston County Clerk. 


   See 1936 photo image of Colored School in Smithland, KY [Livingston County] at ExpoloreUK.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Livingston County, Kentucky

Logan County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Logan County is located in south-central Kentucky on the Tennessee state line and borders five Kentucky counties. It was formed from Lincoln County in 1792 and named for Benjamin Logan, a Revolutionary War veteran and a pioneer from Virginia. Logan County is one of the largest counties in Kentucky. The county seat is Russellville, named for William Russell, Sr., who was also a Revolutionary War veteran. The 1800 population for Logan County was 5,807, according to the Second Census of Kentucky: 4,939 whites, 775 slaves, 93 free coloreds. In 1830 there were five free African American slave owners in Russellville. The 1860 population was 12,667, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 981 slave owners
  • 4,591 Black slaves
  • 791 Mulatto slaves
  • 301 free Blacks
  • 64 free Mulattoes
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 1,230 slave owners
  • 4,863 Black slaves
  • 1,501 Mulatto slaves
  • 265 free Blacks
  • 105 free Mulattoes
1870 U. S. Federal Census
  • 3,955 Blacks
  • 1,691 Mulattoes
  • About 295 U.S. Colored Troops listed Logan County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see Logan County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; Logan County, Kentucky by the Logan County Chamber of Commerce; "Does God See This?": Shakers, Slavery, and the South (thesis) by R. L. Fletcher; Colored Marriage Bonds, Logan County, Ky. to 1900 by M. Vanderpool; Russellville's Black Bottom Project (videorecording) by M. A. Morrow and D. Rightmyer; and History of the A. M. Todd Family by M. A. Morrow.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Logan County, Kentucky

Lyon County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1860-1880
Start Year : 1860
End Year : 1880
Lyon County, located in western Kentucky, was formed in 1854 from a portion of Caldwell County and is bordered by five counties. It was named for Chittenden Lyon, who was born in Vermont and came to Kentucky when he was a child. He was a Kentucky Representative and Senator, and a U.S. Representative. The county seat of Lyon County is Eddyville, which was established in 1798 by David Walker, a Revolutionary War veteran who had received a land grant. The town was named for the eddies in the nearby stream. Eddyville was first established as the seat of Livingston County in 1799, and was later the seat of Caldwell County, before being named the seat of Lyon County in 1854. The 1860 county population was 4,214, according to the U.S. Federal Census, excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, and free Blacks and Mulattoes for 1860-1880.

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 195 slave owners
  • 902 Black slaves
  • 195 Mulatto slaves
  • 34 free Blacks
  • 10 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1,306 Blacks
  • 118 Mulattoes
  • About 85 U.S. Colored Troops listed Lyon County, KY, as their birth location.
1880 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1,102 Blacks
  • 390 Mulattoes
For more see the Lyon County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; Predestinarian Baptist Church Records, 1865-1891 from Predestinarian Baptist Church (Lyon County, Ky.); Marriage Books (indexed), 1854-1987 from Lyon County (Ky.). County Clerk; and Tax Assessment Books, 1863-1911 from Lyon County (Ky.). County Clerk.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M], Kentucky Land Grants
Geographic Region: Lyon County, Kentucky

Madison County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Madison County, named for 4th U.S. President James Madison, is located in central Kentucky, surrounded by seven counties. Madison County was formed in 1785 and the town of Milford served as the county seat until 1798 when Richmond became the county seat. [Judge John Kincaid had named the first county seat after his slave named Milford. It has been written that Kincaid granted Milford his freedom.] Richmond was located on land owned by State Representative John Miller, who named the town for his birthplace, Richmond, VA. In the First Kentucky Census, 1790, there were 5,035 whites and 737 slaves. The 1800 county population was 10,490, according to the Second Census of Kentucky: 8,761 whites, 1,726 slaves, and 3 free coloreds. In 1830 there was one free African American slave owner. In 1860, the population was 11,173, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 812 slave owners
  • 4.392 Black slaves
  • 844 Mulatto slaves
  • 33 free Blacks
  • 37 free Mulattoes

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 945 slave owners
  • 5,039 Black slaves
  • 999 Mulatto slaves
  • 86 free Blacks
  • 63 free Mulattoes

1870 U. S. Federal Census

  • 5,811 Blacks
  • 378 Mulattoes
  • About 356 U.S. Colored Troops listed Madison County, KY, as their birth location.

For more see the Madison County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; Berea and Madison County by J. G. Burnside; A Study of the black Warford and Bates families of Madison County, Kentucky by M. Groth; Connections: the Richmond, Kentucky area African-American heritage guide by the Richmond Tourism and Visitor Center; and History of Middletown Elementary School (archival material). Milford source: see Judge John Kincaid on p.564 in The History of Kentucky by Z. F. Smith.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Madison County, Kentucky

Magoffin County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1860-1880
Start Year : 1860
End Year : 1880
Magoffin County, located in eastern Kentucky and surrounded by six counties, was formed in 1860 from portions of Floyd, Johnson, and Morgan Counties. Magoffin County is named for Beriah Magoffin, a lawyer, state senator, and the 21st Governor of Kentucky. The county seat is Salyersville, named in 1861 for Samuel Salyer, who was a Kentucky Representative; he pushed for the establishment of Magoffin County. The 1860 county population was 3,413, according to the U.S. Federal Census, excluding the slaves. The population increased to 6,943 by 1880. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, and free Blacks and Mulattoes for 1860-1880.

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 13 slave owners
  • 43 Black slaves
  • 28 Mulatto slaves
  • 75 free Mulattoes [most with the last names Cole, Nickell, Oxyer, or Perkins]
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 46 Blacks
  • 105 Mulattoes
  • One U.S. Colored Troop listed Magoffin County, KY, as his birth location. [Nelson Gardner]
1880 U.S. Federal Census
  • 63 Blacks
For more see the Magoffin County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; 'Beriah Magoffin' in Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978, volume 2, by R. Sobel and J. Raimo; and E. T. Price, "The Mixed-blood racial strain of Carmel, Ohio, and Magoffin County, Kentucky," Ohio Journal of Science, vol. 50, issue 6 (November 1950), pp. 281-290 [available online at The Knowledge Bank at OSU].
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Magoffin County, Kentucky

Marion County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Prior to becoming Marion County, the area contained a Roman Catholic settlement with a population from Maryland and was home to the first Roman Catholic church built in Kentucky. The county, located in central Kentucky, was formed from a portion of Washington County in 1834. It is surrounded by seven counties and was named for Francis Marion, a veteran of the Revolutionary War who was known for his guerrilla warfare skills. The county seat, Lebanon, was established in 1814 by Benedict Spadling and John Handley and named for the Biblical Lebanon. The 1840 population was 1,449 [heads of households], according to the U.S. Federal Census, and increased to 9,114 by 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 579 slave owners
  • 2,618 Black slaves
  • 463 Mulatto slaves
  • 54 free Blacks
  • 16 free Mulattoes

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 628 slave owners
  • 2,845 Black slaves
  • 636 Mulatto slaves
  • 92 free Blacks
  • 18 free Mulattoes

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 2,700 Blacks
  • 656 Mulattoes
  • About 106 U.S. Colored Troops listed Marion County, Kentucky, as their birth location.

For more see Marion County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; History of Marion County, Kentucky vol. 1, by the Marion County Historical Society; Searching for Jim: Slavery in Sam Clemen's World, by T. Dempsey; and "McGoodwin v. Shelby" in Legal History of the Color Line: the rise and the triumph of the one-drop rule, F. W. Sweet.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Marion County, Kentucky

Marshall County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Marshall County, located in far western Kentucky and created in 1842, was part of Hickman County, and later it was the northern part of Calloway County. Prior to that, the land belonged to the Chickasaw Indians, and was bought as part of the Jackson Purchase. Marshall County is surrounded by six counties and was named for U.S. Chief Justice John Marshall. In 1842, Benton was named the county seat in honor of Thomas H. Benton, a U.S Senator from Missouri, who was born in North Carolina. The 1850 county population was 5,020, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and it increased to 6,635 by 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, and free Blacks and Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 86 slave owners
  • 204 Black slaves
  • 45 Mulatto slaves
  • 15 free Blacks [most with last name Davis, 3 Whitesides, 1 Grear, 1 Oglevey, 1 Still]
  • 4 free Mulattoes [2 Davis, 1 Grear, 1 Whitesides]
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 125 slave owners
  • 275 Black slaves
  • 80 Mulatto slaves
  • 18 free Blacks
  • 17 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 282 Blacks
  • 86 Mulattoes
  • About 19 U.S. Colored Troops listed Marshall County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see the Marshall County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; History of Marshall County, Kentucky, with illustrations and biographical sketches by Marshall County Genealogical Society; Tax Assessment Books 1843-1892 from Marshall County (KY) County Clerk; Oral History Interview with William Pryor.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Marshall County, Kentucky

Martin County (KY) Free Blacks and Free Mulattoes, 1880-1910
Start Year : 1880
End Year : 1910
Martin County, located in far eastern Kentucky, was formed in 1870 from portions of Floyd, Johnson, Lawrence, and Pike Counties. It was named for John P. Martin, who was born in Virginia and served as a Kentucky Representative and as a Senator. He was also a U.S. Representative from Kentucky. The first county seat was Warfield, and was changed to Inez in 1873. Inez is one of the smallest county seats in Kentucky. The 1880 county population was 3,057, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and it increased to 7,291 by 1910. Martin County was formed after the ratification of the 13th Amendment which freed the slaves in Kentucky. Below are the number of Blacks and Mulattoes in the county 1880, 1900, and 1910.

1880 U.S. Federal Census

  • 30 Blacks [most with last names Davidson, Halden, and Justice]
1900 U. S. Federal Census
  • 12 Blacks
  • 3 Negroes [William and John Fields, and Rebeca J. Smith]
1910 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1 Black [Alfred Richards]
  • 2 Mulattoes [Allie Mickey and Martha Mickins]
For more see Martin County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Martin County, Kentucky

Mason County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Mason County, located in northern Kentucky, was formed in 1788 and was one of the first eight counties established by the Virginia Legislature. It borders four Kentucky counties, and is bound on the north by the Ohio River. Mason County was named for George Mason, who was from Virginia and drafted an early version of the Bill of Rights. Maysville, named for Virginia surveyor John May, is the county seat, and was previously known as Limestone. In the First Census of Kentucky, 1790, there were 2,500 whites and 229 slaves. The 1800 county population was 12,182, according to the Second Census of Kentucky: 10,347 whites, 1,747 slaves, and 88 free coloreds. In 1830 there were nine free African American slave owners in Mason County and three in Washington. By 1860, the population was 14,451, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slaves. Below are the numbers for the slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 967 slave owners
  • 3,454 Black slaves
  • 837 Mulatto slaves
  • 227 free Blacks
  • 155 free Mulattoes

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 779 slave owners
  • 2,903 Black slaves
  • 862 Mulatto slaves
  • 227 free Blacks
  • 158 free Mulattoes

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 2,830 Blacks
  • 743 Mulattoes
  • About 316 U.S. Colored Troops listed Mason County, KY, as their birth location.

For more see the Mason County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; A Historical Sketch of Mason County, Kentucky by L.C. Lee; Free Negroes: inhabitants of Randolph Co., N.C., 1850-1860 by E. R. H. Grady; Marriage Bond Books, 1852-1979 by Mason County (KY) County Clerk; and Slavery in Mason County, Kentucky by C. R. Miller.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Mason County, Kentucky

McCracken County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
McCracken County is located in southwestern Kentucky in the Jackson Purchase region. It was formed from a portion of Hickman County in 1825, and is bordered by the Ohio and Tennessee Rivers and four Kentucky counties. McCracken County was named for Virgil McCracken who was a soldier during the War of 1812. He was wounded in the Battle of the River Raisin and soon after was killed in a raid. Virgil McCracken had been a member of the Kentucky General Assembly, representing Woodford County. The county seat of McCracken County is Paducah, named for the Chickasaw leader Paduke (or Paduoca). There is a statue and historical marker honoring Chief Paduke at the corner of 19th and Jefferson Streets in Paducah. In 1830, the McCracken County population was 205 [heads of households], according to the U.S. Federal Census, and it increased to 8,622 by 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 212 slave owners
  • 666 Black slaves
  • 135 Mulatto slaves
  • 7 free Blacks
  • 15 free Mulattoes

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 396 slave owners
  • 1,460 Black slaves
  • 288 Mulatto slaves
  • 26 free Blacks
  • 42 free Mulattoes

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 2,229 Blacks
  • 998 Mulattoes
  • About 56 U.S. Colored Troops listed McCracken County, KY as their birth location.

For more see McCracken County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia by J. E. Kleber; King to Obama: living the legacy while passing the torch by W. C. Young Community Center; The Light House newspaper; and West Kentucky Vocational School - Minute Book, 1924-1934 Office of Vocational Education. Also listen to the oral history recordings of African Americans from Paducah, KY, at Murray State University.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: McCracken County, Kentucky

McCreary County (KY) Free Blacks and Free Mulattoes, 1920-1930
Start Year : 1920
End Year : 1940
McCreary County was the last county established in Kentucky. It is located in southeastern Kentucky and was developed in 1912 from portions of Pulaski, Wayne, and Whitley counties, and is bordered by those counties and Laurel County, and the state of Tennessee. The county was home to the Beatty Oil Well drilled in 1818 and thought to be the first oil well in Kentucky; the well was located in present day McCreary County [formerly Wayne County]. The county seat is the unincorporated town of Whitley City, which was known as Coolidge until 1880 when the Cincinnati and Southern Railroad placed a depot in the area and named it Whitley. The town was later renamed Whitley City. McCreary County was named for James B. McCreary, a Confederate veteran of the Civil War who served as a Kentucky House Member, Governor of Kentucky, and a U.S. House Member and Senator. It was during McCreary's first term as governor that the Kentucky A&M College [University of Kentucky] was separated from Kentucky University [Transylvania University]. In 1920, the population of McCreary County was 11,682 and that increased to 14,377 by 1930, according to the U.S. Federal Census. The county was formed well after slaves were freed by the 13th Amendment. Below are the number of African Americans in the county 1920-1930.

1920 U.S. Federal Census

  • 24 Blacks [most with the last names Simpson and Logan]
  • 2 Mulattoes [Emma Baker and Cristine Simpson]
  • 2 Coloreds [Juanita Gains and Lafayett R. Kincaid]
  • At least 2 Blacks from McCreary County registered during the WWI Draft [Price Stigall and Henry Logan]

1930 U.S. Federal Census

  • 9 Blacks [last names Brown, Davis, Hudson, Napper, Simpson, Simson, Stegall, and Stigall]
  • 27 Negroes

1940 U.S. Federal Census

  • 40 Negroes

For more see the McCreary County entry in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; The First Oil Well in Kentucky by W. R. Jillson; Rural Health Care Oral History Project by T. H. Gatewood and K. L. Smith; and The Negro Population in Kentucky by A. L. Coleman and D. I. Kim.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: McCreary County, Kentucky

McLean County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1860-1880
Start Year : 1860
End Year : 1880
McLean County, located in western Kentucky, was formed in 1854 from portions of Daviess, Muhlenberg and Ohio Counties. It is bordered by six counties and was named for Alney McLean, a veteran of the Civil War, who was born in North Carolina and served as a Kentucky Representative and in the U.S. Congress. The county seat is Calhoun, which was sometimes spelled Calhoon. The town was initially called Rhoadsville, after Henry Rhoads, who helped plot the town in 1785. The name was later changed to Fort Vienna in 1787, then named Calhoun in 1849 in honor of Congressman John Calhoun. The county population was 5,255 in 1860, according to the U.S. Federal Census; it increased to 9,304 by 1880, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1860-1880.

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 289 slave owners
  • 733 Black slaves
  • 178 Mulatto slaves
  • 1 free Black [John H. Gloster]
  • 1 free Colored [Nancy Moodie]
  • 20 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 692 Blacks
  • 193 Mulattoes
  • About 14 U.S. Colored Troops listed McLean County, KY as their birth location.
1880 U.S. Federal Census
  • 705 Blacks
  • 1 Mulatto [Lou Pruitt]
For more see McLean County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; McLean County, Kentucky, 1809-1914: African American Marriages, by A. L. McLaughlin; Tax Assessment Books, 1855-1891, McLean County (KY) Clerk; and The Negro Population of Kentucky, by A. L. Coleman and D. I. Kim.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: McLean County, Kentucky

Meade County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Meade County, located in northwestern Kentucky along the Ohio River, was formed in 1823 from the bordering counties of Breckinridge and Hardin. The county was named in honor of James Meade, who was killed in the Battle of River Raisin. Fort Knox was constructed in 1918, and 15,000 acres of the site were located in Meade County. Brandenburg was named the county seat in 1825, although the community had existed since the early 1800s, when Solomon Brandenburg purchased a tract of land and built his tavern; the town of Brandenburg developed around the tavern. The 1830 county population was 570 [heads of households], according to the U.S. Federal Census, and increased to 6,966 by 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 335 slave owners
  • 1,232 Black slaves
  • 339 Mulatto slaves
  • 16 free Blacks
  • 5 free Mulattoes [all with last name Alexander]
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 372 slave owners
  • 1,463 Black slaves
  • 468 Mulatto slaves
  • 13 free Blacks
  • 9 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1,061 Blacks
  • 253 Mulattoes
  • About 15 U.S. Colored Troops gave Meade County, KY, as their birth location.
For more see Meade County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; Civil War Incidents in and Around Meade County, Kentucky, by M. Myers; Marriage Books, 1824-1974, Meade County (KY) County Clerk; and Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad in Kentucky, by J. B. Hudson.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Meade County, Kentucky

Menifee County (KY) Free Blacks and Free Mulattoes, 1870-1900
Start Year : 1870
End Year : 1900
Menifee County, surrounded by six counties and located in eastern Kentucky, was formed in 1869 from portions of Bath, Montgomery, Morgan, Powell, and Wolfe Counties. It was named in honor of Richard H. Menefee (spelling variation), who was Commonwealth's Attorney, a Kentucky House Member, and a U.S. Senator. The county seat of Menifee County is Frenchburg, established in 1869 and named in honor of Richard French, a lawyer and circuit court judge who served in both the Kentucky and the U.S. House of Representatives. Menifee County was formed after the slaves were freed by the ratification of the 13th Amendment. The 1870 county population was 1,986, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and increased to 6,889 by 1900. Below are the numbers for the Blacks and Mulattoes in the county for 1870-1900.

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 14 Blacks [last names Davis, Williams, and Willis, 1 Roggers]
  • 3 Mulattoes [Jack Donathan, Anna Kring, and Pressilla Wills]
1880 U.S. Federal Census
  • 46 Blacks [most with last name Monear, Simpson, Wilston, and Williams]
1900 U.S. Federal Census
  • 41 Blacks [most with last name Manier, Bush, Gay, and Williams]
For more see Menifee County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; and A History of Menifee County, Kentucky, by the Menifee County Historical Book Committee.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Menifee County, Kentucky

Mercer County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Mercer County, located in central Kentucky, was formed in 1785 from a portion of Lincoln County. It was named for Hugh Mercer, from Scotland, who was a physician killed during the American Revolutionary War. Mercer County was the sixth county formed in Kentucky, and it is surrounded by six counties. Harrodsburg, the county seat, was first called Harrod's Town. It was founded in 1774 by James Harrod, who was a pioneer, explorer, and a soldier in the French and Indian War. Harrodsburg is considered the first permanently established settlement in Kentucky. In the First Census of Kentucky, 1790, there were 5,745 whites, 1,339 slaves, and 7 free persons. The 1800 county population was 9,646, according to the Second Census of Kentucky: 7,297 whites, 2,316 slaves, and 33 free coloreds. In 1830 there were nine free African American slave owners. By 1860, the population had increased to 10,427, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 619 slave owners
  • 2,952 Black slaves
  • 295 Mulatto slaves
  • 261 free Blacks
  • 73 free Mulattoes

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 618 slave owners
  • 2,353 Black slaves
  • 732 Mulatto slaves
  • 103 Colored slaves
  • 167 free Blacks
  • 1 free Colored [Parellee Meaux]
  • 89 free Mulattoes

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 2,691 Blacks
  • 566 Mulattoes
  • About 142 U.S. Colored Troops listed Mercer, KY, as their birth location.

For more see Mercer County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; Letters to Ministers and Elders on the Sin of Holding Slaves, and the Duty of Immediate Emancipation, by J. G. Birney; Marriage Books, 1786-1984, Mercer County (KY) County Clerk; and Through Two Hundred Years, by G. M. Chinn and R. W. Conover.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Mercer County, Kentucky

Metcalfe County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1860-1880
Start Year : 1860
End Year : 1880
Metcalfe County, located in south-central Kentucky, was formed in 1860 from portions of Adair, Barren, Cumberland, Greene, Hart, and Monroe Counties. It is named for Kentucky Governor Thomas Metcalfe, who also served as a U.S. Representative and Senator. Edmonton was named the county seat in 1860. The town was named for Edmund Rogers (spelling variation), who owned the land where he laid out the town in 1818. Edmund Rogers was a veteran of the American Revolutionary War and a land surveyor. The 1860 county population was 5,964, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and it increased to 9,440 by 1880, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1860-1880.

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 181 slave owners
  • 557 Black slaves
  • 225 Mulatto slaves
  • 26 free Blacks
  • 24 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 480 Blacks
  • 447 Mulattoes
  • At least one U.S. Colored Troop listed Metcalfe County, KY as his birth location [Joseph Reed].
1880 U.S. Federal Census
  • 661 Blacks
  • 378 Mulattoes
For more see Metcalfe County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; James H. Read's Tax Book for 1865, by J. H. Read; and Metcalfe Co. Kentucky Vital Statistics, by S. K. L. Gorin.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Metcalfe County, Kentucky

Monroe County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Monroe County is located in south-central Kentucky on the Tennessee state line and is bordered by four Kentucky counties. It was formed in 1820 from portions of Barren and Cumberland Counties and is named for James Monroe, fifth president of the United States. Tompkinsville, which became the county seat in 1820, is named for Daniel Tompkins, who was Vice President during the Monroe administration. Tompkinsville was first known as Watson's Store, founded in 1809, receiving its present name in 1819. The land for the town was owned by Thomas B. Monroe, a cousin of President James Monroe. The 1820 county population was 723 [heads of households], according to the U.S. Federal Census, and the population increased to 7,629 by 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, and free Blacks and Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 190 slave owners
  • 697 Black slaves
  • 134 Mulatto slaves
  • 17 free Blacks [most with last names Fulkes and Howard]
  • 7 free Mulattoes [last names Speakman, Page, Kingrey, Fulkes, and Bedford]

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 200 slave owners
  • 775 Black slaves
  • 150 Mulatto slaves
  • 9 free Blacks [last names Howard, 1 Jackson, 1 Taylor]
  • 9 free Mulattoes [most with last name Speakman, 2 Howard, 1 Colter, 1 Chism]

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 599 Blacks
  • 143 Mulattoes
  • About 15 U.S. Colored Troops listed Monroe County, KY as their birth location.

Freetown

  • Around 1845, Freetown (or Free-town) was established for the freed slaves of William Howard, a wealthy slave owner in Monroe County. Freetown was the first African American community in the county, established on the land that had been provided by William Howard. A roadside historical marker has been placed near the Mount Vernon Church, which also served as a school for the Freetown community. There is also a cemetery near the church.

 
For more see Monroe County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia, edited by J. E. Kleber; South Central Kentucky Vital Statistics, by M. B. Gorin; The Saga of Coe Ridge, by W. L. Montell; Black Heritage Sites, by N. C. Curtis; and the Cora Mae Howard oral history interview by James Kelly Shirley (FA 474), at Western Kentucky University, Manuscripts and Folklife Archives.
Subjects: Communities, Freedom, Kentucky African American Churches, Undertakers, Cemeteries, Coroners, & Obituaries, Grade Schools & High Schools in Kentucky, Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Monroe County, Kentucky

Montgomery County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Montgomery County was established in 1796 and bordered the state of Virginia before the land was subdivided into four additional counties, three of which border Montgomery County today. The county was named for Richard Montgomery, a general who was killed during the American Revolutionary War. The county seat is Mt. Sterling, founded in 1792 and named for Stirling, Scotland, by proprietor Hughes Forbes. The 1800 county population was 7,082, according to the Second Census of Kentucky: 6,304 whites; 767 slaves, and 11 free coloreds.  In 1830 there was one free African American slave owner. By 1860, the population had increased to 5,180, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slave population. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 532 slave owners
  • 2,588 Black slaves
  • 483 Mulatto slaves
  • 128 free Blacks
  • 37 free Mulattoes
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 479 slave owners
  • 1,969 Black slaves
  • 783 Mulatto slaves
  • 133 free Blacks
  • 6 free Mulattoes [last names Davis, Glover, King, and Reavis]
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 2,037 Blacks
  • 599 Mulattoes
  • About 174 U.S. Colored Troops listed Montgomery County, KY as their birth location.
For more see Montgomery County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; The Early History of Montgomery County, Kentucky by E. P. McCollough; P. W. L. Jones Collection (archival material); and articles in the Mt. Sterling Advocate newspaper.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Montgomery County, Kentucky

Morgan County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Morgan County was created from Bath and Floyd Counties in 1822, and was named for Daniel Morgan, an American Revolutionary War veteran and a U.S. Representative for Virginia. Morgan County is located in east-central Kentucky, and West Liberty is the county seat. The 1830 county population was 474 [heads of households], according to the U.S. Federal Census, and the population increased to 9,068 by 1860, excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 59 slave owners
  • 187 Black slaves
  • 0 Mulatto slaves
  • 26 free Blacks [last names Collins, Jackson, and Masters]
  • 18 free Mulattoes [most with last name Perkins, 1 Jones, 1 Letrel, and 1 with no last name]

1860 Slave Schedule

  • 53 slave owners
  • 115 Black slaves
  • 55 Mulatto slaves
  • 58 free Blacks [last names Gibson, Gipson, Nickell, Phillips, and Reffet]
  • 23 free Mulattoes [last names Collins and Perkins]

1870 U.S. Federal Census

  • 21 Blacks
  • 20 Mulattoes
  • About 33 U.S. Colored Troops listed Morgan County, KY, as their birth location.

For more see Morgan County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; and Morgan County, Kentucky, Historical, Industrial, Past, Present, Future by Licking Valley Courier.

 

The following information was provided by Morgan County, KY, historian Ron Gevedon.

  • 1840  Free Colored: 3  -  Slaves: 61   [Historical Sketches of Kentucky.1848.p.152]
  • 1844 Slaves over 16: 56  /  1845 Slaves over 16: 49  [Kentucky Public Documents.1845.pp.164-165]
  • 1845 106 slaves total in Morgan County with value of $36,550  /  1846 127 slaves with value $41,550  /  1845 Slaves over 16: 49  /  1846 slaves over 16: 62  [Kentucky Public Documents.1846.pp.208-209]
  • 1847 Total no. slaves: 139 with value of $48,425  /  1846 Total no, slaves: 127 with value $41,550  /  1847 slaves over 16: 60  /  1846 slaves over 16: 69  [Kentucky Public Documents.1847.pp.208-209]
  • Mr. Harris presented a petition of Thomas B. Keeton, of Morgan County, praying for passage of law permitting him to import a slave into this state  [Journal for the Senate of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.1844.p.90. 15 Jan. 1845]
  • 1848 157 slaves with value of $56,115  /  1847 139 slaves with value of $48,425  /  1848 slaves over 16: 74  /  1847 slaves over 16: 66  /  [Kentucky Public Documents.1848.pp.210-211]
  • 1849 154 slaves with value $64,250  /  1849 Slaves over 16: 76  {Kentucky Public Documents.1849.pp.218-219]
  • 1851 151 slaves with value $56,800  /  1850 175 slaves with value $ 64,250  /  1851 slaves over 16: 72  /  1850 slaves over 16: 83  [Kentucky Public Documents.1851.pp.267-268]
  • 1853 183 slaves with value $79,500  /  1852 184 slaves with value $72,130  /  1853 slaves over 16: 85  /  1852 slaves over 16: 84  /  Total Births & Deaths as of 31 Dec. 1852: Births: 5 (2 male, 3 female)  /  Deaths: isn’t listed  /  Total colored population as of 1850 census: 225  [Kentucky Public Documents.1853.pp.168-169]
  • 1856 Population: 225  /  Births: 8 (5 male3 female)  /  Deaths: 6 (4 male, 2 female)  [Report to General Assembly…Vol.s 4-6,1 856.p.7]
  • 1857 206 slaves with value $120,647  /  1856 187 slaves with value $110,899  /  1857 slaves over 16: 94  /  1856 slaves over 16: 93  /  Births: 8 (7 male1 female)  /  Deaths: 26 (7 male, 19 female)  /  Average age at death: 18.9 years  [Kentucky Public Documents.1857.V.2.pp.176-177, p.12]
  • 1859 198 slaves with value $118,825  /  1858 204 with value $116,550  /  1859 slaves over 16: 90  /  1858 slaves over 16: 91   [Kentucky Public Documents.1860]
  • 1863 115 slaves with value $48,150  /  1862 112 slaves with value $65,250  / 1863 slaves over 16: 57  / 1862 slaves over 16: 48  [Kentucky Public Documents.1864.pp.182-183.Doc.No.10]
  • 1867 Negroes over 18: 0  /  1867 children between 6 & 20: 0  /  1866 Negroes over 18: 6  /  1866 children between 6 & 20: 17  [Kentucky Public Documents.Vol.1, 1867.pp.214-215]

 
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Morgan County, Kentucky

Muhlenberg County (KY) Slaves, Free Blacks, and Free Mulattoes, 1850-1870
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1870
Muhlenberg County was formed from portions of Christian and Logan Counties in 1798, and is located in west-central Kentucky, surrounded by seven counties. It is named for John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg, a minister, an American Revolutionary War veteran, and he served in the U.S. House and Senate from Pennsylvania. The county seat is Greenville, named for Nathanael Greene who was also a veteran of the American Revolutionary War, and served in the Rhode Island General Assembly. The 1800 county population was 1,443, according to the Second Census of Kentucky: 1,313 whites, 125 slaves, and 5 free coloreds. The population increased to 9,143 by 1860, according to the U.S. Federal Census, and excluding the slaves. Below are the number of slave owners, slaves, free Blacks, and free Mulattoes for 1850-1870.

1850 Slave Schedule

  • 337 slave owners
  • 1,260 Black slaves
  • 256 Mulatto slaves
  • 23 free Blacks
  • 15 free Mulattoes
1860 Slave Schedule
  • 348 slave owners
  • 1,175 Black slaves
  • 409 Mulatto slaves
  • 13 free Blacks
  • 20 free Mulattoes
1870 U.S. Federal Census
  • 1,227 Blacks
  • 367 Mulattoes
  • About 11 U.S.Colored Troops listed Muhlenberg County, KY as their birth location.
For more see Muhlenberg County in The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by J. E. Kleber; Around Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, a Black History by L, S. Smith; A History of Muhlenberg County by O. A. Rothart; Muhlenberg County, First Black Marriage Book by G. R. Carver; and Muhlenberg County School Census, 1930. See photo image of Central City Negro School in Kentucky Digital Library- Images.

Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M]
Geographic Region: Muhlenberg County, Kentucky

The Slave Rebellion Website [online]
Start Year : 2010
The Slave Rebellion Website is sponsored by The New World African Press. In reference to Kentucky, the site includes references to African and slave insurrections and actions. The population database covers the census years 1790-1890 for all states, and includes the number of slaves per county between 1790-1860. There are also some data on free persons of color by sex, county, and decade.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county A-C], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county D-J], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county N-Z]
Geographic Region: Kentucky / United States

U.S. Census: Slave Schedules, Black or Mulatto, Colored
Start Year : 1850
End Year : 1890
African American slaves were first enumerated in the U.S. Federal Census in 1850 in a separate census called Slave Schedules. The 1850 Census was also the first in which all members of a household were listed by name; prior to 1850, only the heads of households were listed by name. As for slaves listed in the 1850 Slave Schedules, the vast majority are not listed by name but rather are numbered by age, sex, and color [Black or Mulatto] from the oldest to the youngest, all under the name of the slave owner. Also listed were the reported fugitive and manumitted (freed) slaves and the deaf, blind, insane, and idiotic slaves. A second slave census was taken in 1860. Kentucky was one of the 18 states included in the 1850 Slave Schedules and one of the 17 states in the 1860 Slave Schedules. African American slaves had been freed by the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 or by the ratification of the 13th Amendment in 1865. Because Kentucky did not secede from the Union, Kentucky slaves were freed by the ratification of the 13th Amendment. In the 1870 and 1880 U.S. Federal Censuses, African Americans are included as Black or Mulatto. When the 1890 Census was taken, the term "Colored" was also used as a race descriptor for some African Americans, as well as for Chinese, Hawaiians, Japanese, Puerto Ricans, Swiss, Native Americans, and many others. As early as 1850, the term "Colored" had been used in the U.S. Federal Census and in the census of some individual states to describe free persons who were not White. Well beyond the year 1900, in the United States, the terms Black, Mulatto, and Colored were all used on birth, death, and military records, and on ship passenger lists. For more information about the race descriptors used in the early U.S. Census data, contact the U.S. Census Bureau; see Shades of Citizenship, by M. Nobles; Census and Identity, by D. I. Kertzer and D. Arel; and Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census, by M. J. Anderson.
Subjects: Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county A-C], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county D-J], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county K-M], Slave Owners, Slaves, Free Blacks, Free Mulattoes in Kentucky, 1850-1870 [by county N-Z], Race Categories
Geographic Region: Kentucky / United States

 

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