From NKAA, Notable Kentucky African Americans Database (main entry)
Automobile Industry Final 1.pdf

Automobile Industry Employment: Kentucky, African Americans

(start date: 1910  -  end date: 1930) 

By Reinette F. Jones, with assistance from Kathy L. Schiflett - 03/28/2018

1910-1930 DRAWING POWER OF THE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY


Repeated family tales give credit to thousands of African American men from Kentucky who headed up north at the turn of the 20th Century to work in car factories and find a better way of life. Perhaps the pleasure is in the telling of the stories, but there were actually only a few hundred from Kentucky who made the trek and found employment in the northern automobile industry. The men were part of the first wave of families migrating to the industries in northern cities during the early 1900s. Knowing how many were employed in the automobile industry requires quite a bit of research, because it was not until about 1930 that the automobile industry began keeping data on African Americans as employees and as consumers.

The invention and mass production of the car created new and various kinds of employment that drew a few thousand African Americans to northern cities. The period, 1910-1930, was just after the turn of the century, just prior to the labor union membership campaign, and the early years leading to the Great Depression, and decreasing wages in the automobile industry. It was also the period when the African American population in Kentucky decreased by 35,616.

The population loss was not due to the outmigration to automobile industry jobs. African Americans from Kentucky were an extremely small part of the northern workforce in the automobile industry between 1910 and 1930. The same was true for the automobile industry in Kentucky. The difference, however, was that African American men who were native Kentuckians were entering the automobile industry workforce in Kentucky more often than they were in any other state. To say it another way, between 1910 and 1930, African American men who left Kentucky were looking for opportunities in other states, and seeking jobs in the automobile industry was not the leading factor.

Looking at the data provided by S. A. Reich in Table 3.1 on p.69 in his book, A Working People: a history of African American workers since Emancipation, the automobile industry was not the largest industry employer for African Americans between 1910 and 1930. African Americans made up 4% of the U.S. automobile industry workforce in 1920 [8,156] and in 1930 [25,895], and that was up from a low of 0.5% [569] in 1910. In relation to other industries, the employment percentages and actual numbers were much higher for African Americans in the steel industry [1910 : 5.5% (17,432)]; [1920 : 13.6% (47,797)]; [1930 : 13.3% (45,472)]. The numbers and percentages had also been higher in the meatpacking industry [1910 : 6.2% (5,800)]; [1920 : 21.4% (28,300)]; [1930 : 11.8% (20,400)]. 

So, while the automobile industry drew potential African American employees to various northern cities between 1910 and 1930, it was not the sole industry to do so, and it did not become a recognized industry employer of African Americans until after a couple of decades into the 20th Century. The increased number of African American employees occurred when the overall number of employees increased in the automobile industry. In 1930, that total was 640,474 employees, and of that number, the African American employees total was 25,895 or 4%. The labor force in the automobile industry was thought to have stabilized by 1930; some would say it had reached a peak in terms of competition, profits, and number of employees.

However, going back to 1910, the types of jobs African Americans held in the automobile industry on the national level were at the bottom of the job ladder in less skilled positions and in the most hazardous positions. Little had changed by 1930 when a very small number of African Americans were in more skilled positions, or were car salesmen, or owners of car-related businesses. Those who were employed in more skilled positions were most probably employed by the Ford Motor Company in Detroit, MI. [See Ford Motor Company History website]

The Ford Motor Company was the first automobile manufacturing company to hire African Americans. The company had sent employment agents to southern states offering African Americans $5 per day for factory work, the same pay as whites. Employment for African Americans in southern manufacturing paid between $1.50-$1.75 per day. In October of 1916, the Ford Motor Company announced that "the gentler sex" [women] too would be making the same pay as men, $5 per day [source: "Henry Ford Gives Women - Hands Credit to Wilson, $5 per day, The Day Book (Chicago), 10/25/1916, p.8].

It is not known if the Ford Motor Company recruitment agents came to Kentucky, or if the company considered Kentucky a southern state. In 1919, there was an ad on the front page of a Kentucky newspaper announcing the Ford Motor Company pay of $7 per day [source: Richmond Daily Register, 07/22/1919, p.1]. The Ford Motor Company paid some of the highest wages to African Americans in the automobile industry, which had the desired effect of creating anti-union attitudes among African Americans in Detroit. All of that would change; in 1927, the Ford Motor Company was feeling the pressure of competition, which led to several of the Ford factories being closed in order to retool and perfect the design of a new car, the 1928 Model A. Added to these changes was the increase in the number of African American employees joining labor unions.

Many sources chronicle and analyze the entry and advancement of African Americans in the automobile industry and the joining of labor unions. A few titles have been listed below for additional information. The remainder of this entry looks specifically at where and when African American Kentucky natives were employed in the automobile industry from 1910-1930.

Sources: The Negro in the Automobile Industry by H. R. Northrup; C. S. Johnson, "The Changing economic status of the Negro," The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, v.140 The American Negro, (Nov. 1928), pp.128-137; L. H. Bailer, "The Negro automobile worker," Journal of Political Economy, v.51, no.5 (Oct., 1943), pp.415-428; J. F. Kain, "Housing segregation, Negro employment, and metropolitan decentralization," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, v.LXXXII, No.2 (May 1968), pp.175-197; African Americans in the U.S. Economy edited by C. A. Conrad et. al.; Great Depression: people and perspectives by H. Cravens and P. C. Mancall; Black Detroit and the Rise of the UAW by A. Meier and E. Rudwick; "Automobile Industry" in Encyclopedia of African American Society, v.1, A-L, Sage Publications, 2005; and Technology and the African-American Experience: needs and opportunities for study edited by B. Sinclair.

1910-1930 AFRICAN AMERICAN EMPLOYEES IN AND FROM KENTUCKY IN THE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY

The following information is based on data taken from the U.S. Census looking at 584 African Americans who were born in Kentucky and employed in the automobile industry as it was defined by the U.S. Census Bureau from 1910 to 1930. The data is available in the .pdf document attached to this entry.

  • Negro population in Kentucky in 1910 was 261,656 or 11.4% [131,492 males and 130,164 females], down from 13.3% in 1900 [source: pp.721 & 723 in Thirteenth Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1910, Volume 2].
  • Negro population in Kentucky in 1920 was 235,938 or 9.8% [118,548 males and 117,390 females], down from 11.4% in 1910 [source: p.26 in Fourteenth Census of the United States, State Compendium, Kentucky].
  • Negro population in Kentucky in 1930 was 226,040 or 8.6% [113,501 males and 112,539 females], down from 9.8% in 1920 [source: pp.38 & 99 in Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930, Population, Volume II, General Report Statistics by Subject].  


During the first three decades of the 20th Century, African Americans in and from Kentucky were employed in 25 states doing a variety of jobs in the automobile industry. Of the total employees, 5 were women and 579 were men. The automobile industry was a male workplace. It was rare for women such as Anna M. Ray in Chicago to be a car inspector in 1930; Birdie Hayne was a machinist in Detroit in 1920; 16-year-old, Mabel Young, worked in an automobile factory in St. Louis in 1920; and there was Margaret Owsley, in Indianapolis, who was a maid at an automobile store in 1920; and Mattie Morgan was a scrub woman in an automobile shop in Louisville in 1920. The 1916 announcement in the The Day Book (Chicago) that women would be paid $5 per day at the Ford Motor Company in Detroit, may not have been a message that reached African American women in Kentucky [see Negro Women in Industry by U.S. Department of Labor].

For the African American male automobile industry employees from Kentucky, there were more than 60 jobs identified in the census records. The jobs ranged in skills and duties, and included the employment of an elevator boy, assemblers, cement workers, a delivery boy, laborers, mechanics, a tire repairer, molders, a vulcanizer, an air hyster, and chauffeurs/drivers. There were also two teamsters: James H. Roberts working in a Detroit, MI, automobile company in 1910; and Adolph Dimeree who was working in an automobile body factory in Louisville, KY, in 1930.

The first group of employees were found in the 1910 U.S. Census. There were 49 African American males born in Kentucky and employed in the automobile industry, and the majority lived in Kentucky (14), Indiana (14), and Ohio (12). The top jobs were chauffeurs/drivers (21), laborers (7), and machinists (6). The chauffeurs/drivers were employed at automobile companies or were private drivers in Indianapolis, IN; Cincinnati, Columbus, and Dayton, OH; East St. Louis, Chicago, and Bloomington, IL; Wichita, KS; and Louisville and Mayfield, KY. 

By 1910, African American males were still very much employed as drivers of horse drawn vehicles, and they were slowly moving toward employment such as chauffeurs and private drivers of automobiles. According to authors L. J. Greene and C. G. Woodson, in their book The Negro Wage Earner, pp.110-112, the number of teamsters, draymen, hackmen, and chauffeurs more than doubled between 1890-1910. They were the second largest group of Negro workers in trade and transportation and were doing menial employment referred to in the South as "Negro jobs." These were the same jobs available to African American men in northern cities who could not find employment in the factories. Having a Negro chauffeur was thought to be a status symbol of wealth and class for the employers. For the workers, in 1909, the average yearly wage in the automobile industry was $643, about $12.36 per week, or $2.06 per day (6-day workweek) [source: Report on Motor Vehicle Industry by the Federal Trade Commission, June 5, 1939, p.8].

In the 1920 U.S. Census, of the 203 African American males born in Kentucky and employed in the automobile industry, there were 44 mechanics, 43 laborers, 33 chauffeurs/drivers, 23 machinists, and 16 repairmen. The number of chauffeurs/drivers had increased by 12 since the count in 1910. [Note: The chauffeur operating license cost $2 in Kentucky in 1920, and it cost $1 to renew the license - source: Facts and Figures of the Automobile Industry, 1921, p.73.] 

While the number of chauffeurs had slightly increased, African American men were moving into jobs that required some degree of technical skills as mechanics. There were also those who entered the automobile industry as undefined laborers. All were probably employees learning on their own or receiving on the job training, and individuals providing services to African American automobile owners, because in 1920, automobile insurance, and automobile service and repair were all segregated. Two ways of getting around the barriers were self-employment and education. Schools in Kentucky were segregated, and of the high schools that offered trades to African American students, there is no mention of them having automobile technical training courses by 1920.

The recognized automobile school in Kentucky was in the Y.M.C.A. central branch in Louisville, KY [source: Facts and Figures of the Automobile Industry, 1921, p.84]. In 1920, the Y.M.C.A. branches in Louisville were segregated, and the central branch was designated for whites. In the high schools, automotive mechanic courses were very slowly being added as part of the eight-four plan of reorganizing schools to include four years of high school [source: The Gates Open Slowly by F. L. McVey, p.262]. The reorganization started in 1917, and three years later, the plan had not gotten off the ground. The unfinished work was the reorganization of the vocational curriculum, especially the preparation of teachers and the expenditures of vocational funds [source: Biennial Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Kentucky for the Two Years Ending June 30, 1921, pp.43-47]. A full-time supervisor of Trades and Industries and Home Economics education had been employed. A department of vocational teacher-training was organized at the land-grant schools, University of Kentucky and Kentucky Normal and Industrial Institute [now Kentucky State University]. 

So, while public education in Kentucky was attempting to get more organized in order to offer the vocational education courses that would include automobile technical courses in the newly formed high schools, employment in the automobile industry was moving forward. African Americans were employed in automobile factories and companies, and they were employed in the small automobile-related businesses such as car garages, stations, stores, and shops in Chicago, IL; Indianapolis, IN; Detroit, MI; St. Louis, MO; Winston Salem, NC; Dayton, Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Findlay, OH; and in the Kentucky cities of Barbourville, Frankfort, Hopkinsville, Lexington, Louisville, Paducah, and Parker.

There was evidence of the automobile industry's drawing power to get a few African American males in Kentucky to move to other states. Of the 203 Kentucky-born men employed in the automobile industry in 1920, the majority lived in Kentucky (64), Ohio (40), Michigan (32), and Indiana (22). Smaller groups of employees had settled in Illinois, New York, Missouri, California, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. In addition, there were individual employees who settled in Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, North Carolina, New Jersey, Oregon, Utah, Wisconsin, and West Virginia.

In Kentucky, the employment of 64 African Americans in the automobile industry was almost nothing given that the automobile industry was booming across the board. Over two million passenger and commercial vehicles were produced in the United States in 1920, with the greatest sales in the U.S. and Europe. In addition to the European sales was 12,183 vehicles shipped to African countries and nations, geographic locations that were under European rule [source: Facts and Figures of the Automobile Industry, 1921, p. 53]. Vehicle production in Kentucky came from the state's one passenger car factory and one motor truck factory. Consumers in Kentucky included the rural schools that used motor buses to transport 4,500 students. The state's total motor vehicle registrations were up from 19,500 in 1915 to 112,683 in 1920. Kentucky ranked 25th among the U.S. vehicle registrations in 1920. In Kentucky, there were 483 passenger car dealers; 311 truck dealers; 490 automobile garages; 598 repair shops; and 662 supply dealers. Total gross motor vehicle revenue for Kentucky in 1920 was $815,539.31 [if converted to 2018 dollars, that amount would be $10,637,566.82]. ~ [Source: Facts and Figures of the Automobile Industry, 1921, pp.7, 9, 21, 33, and 38-39.] The average yearly wage in the automobile industry in 1919 had increased from $1,431 to $1,498 in 1921 [source: Report on Motor Vehicle Industry by the Federal Trade Commission, June 5, 1939, p.8].

By 1930, automotive mechanics courses had been added to the high school curriculum in Kentucky. For African Americans in and from Kentucky, the number of male automobile mechanics was at an all-time high of 105, though the men were still a very miniscule part of the automobile industry workforce. Of the 327 African American males born in Kentucky and employed in the automobile industry in 1930, there were 105 mechanics, 76 laborers, 17 porters, 15 car washers, 15 machinist, 14 janitors/maintenance workers, 11 chauffeurs/drivers, 11 repairmen, 6 salesmen, and the remaining 162 men were individuals employed in 40 other automobile-related jobs. The 327 African American men lived and worked in 22 states with most in Kentucky (93), Michigan (69), Indiana (46), Ohio (37), and Illinois (31). 

The employment of Kentucky's African American males in the automobile industry in Michigan (69), was starting to rival that of the employment of African American males in the automobile industry in Kentucky (93). In Michigan, there were 66 men employed in the city of Detroit and the Wayne County area. The men were laborers (36), machinist (6), janitors/maintenance workers (4), hammer hands (2), and 18 individuals employed in various jobs from car washer to welder.

Meanwhile, in Kentucky, the number of African American male mechanics had tripled since the last census. Of the 105 mechanics counted in the 1930 census, the largest group (48) were employed at home: Louisville (13), Lexington (5), and three or less in Madisonville, Heidrick, Ashland, Bowling Green, Cynthiana, Harlan, Henderson, Henryville, Hopkinsville, Kitchen, Maysville, New Castle, Olive Hill, Owensboro, Paducah, Russellville, Shelbyville, Stanley, Winchester, and Woodford County. 

The next largest group of African American automobile industry employees in and from Kentucky were the 76 laborers, of which only 10 were in Kentucky: Covington, Hopkinsville, Kitchen, Louisville (4), Maysville, New Castle, and Somerset.

The number of chauffeurs/drivers had decreased from the 33 counted in 1920 to 11 in 1930: Cincinnati, OH (2); Nashville, TN (1); and 8 in Kentucky - Frankfort (2), Lexington, Louisville (3), Market House, and Maysville. The chauffeurs/drivers were the third largest group of African American men in Kentucky who were employed in the automobile industry.  

As the 1930s were about to begin, in the Kentucky automobile industry, a few African Americans had moved into new jobs. The moves was a mixed bag of old menial jobs that were now available to African Americans in the automobile industry, combined with new jobs in the automobile industry that had not been open to African Americans in Kentucky: car maker - Louisville; car washer - Louisville, Maysville (2), and Owensboro; helper - Louisville; laundry - Bowling Green, Covington, and Marion; molder - Madisonville; teamster - Louisville; tire repairman - Owensboro; trimmer - Lexington; and unload cars - Louisville.

There was one passenger car assembly plant in Kentucky and it was in Louisville [source: p.16 in Facts and Figures of the Automobile Industry, 1929 edition]. Kentucky had 808 vehicle dealers; 1,301 repair shops; 1,166 retail supply stores and supply departments; and 163 parts and accessory wholesalers [pp.34-35]. Kentucky led the southeast in new truck sales with 4,680 [p.52]; Kentucky ranked second, behind Arkansas, with the least number of transportation buses, 599 [p.61]; and ranked last in number of private carrier buses with 199 [p.64]. Kentucky continued to rank 25th in U.S. vehicle registrations with 304,231 [p.66]. Kentucky state license taxes, including gas taxes, totaled $11,467,039 in 1928 [p.76]. The automobile industry in Kentucky was still viable and flourishing. On the national level, the average yearly wage in 1929 was $1,638, and due to The Depression, it would decrease to $1,228 in 1931, and to $1,035 in 1933 [source: Report on Motor Vehicle Industry by the Federal Trade Commission, June 5, 1939, p.8]..

The Depression came when things were starting to look up; in other cities, especially in Detroit and Chicago, there were more African Americans from Kentucky who were working in new types of automobile industry jobs than those in Kentucky. The jobs were higher skilled positions: air hyster - Saginaw, MI; assembler - Los Angeles, CA; car body builder - Chicago; crane operator - Detroit; die mover - Detroit; drill press operator - Detroit; fireman - Detroit; floor man - Chicago; foundry hand - Indianapolis IN; hammer hand (2) - Detroit; heater man - Detroit and Ft. Wayne IN; license inspector - Chicago; millwright - Detroit; receiving clerk - Chicago; salesmen - Chicago, Dayton OH, Detroit, Elmsford NY, Gary IN, and Royal Oak MI; sand blaster - Cleveland OH; shipping clerk - Springfield OH; steel cutter - Detroit; tool grinder - Detroit; tool maker - Detroit (2); vulcanizer - Chicago; and welder - Detroit. 

Kentucky County & Region

Read about Jefferson County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Logan County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Boyd County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Knox County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Warren County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Larue County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Kenton County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Harrison County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Boyle County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Fleming County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Franklin County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Scott County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Muhlenberg County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Harlan County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Henderson County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Nicholas County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Christian County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Hopkins County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Anderson County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Logan County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Fayette County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Crittenden County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Woodford County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Graves County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Mason County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Henry County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Carter County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Daviess County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about McCracken County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Edmonson County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Bell County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Scott County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Shelby County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Pulaski County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Clark County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Carroll County, Kentucky in Wikipedia.

Kentucky Place (Town or City)

Read about Louisville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Adairville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Ashland, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Barbourville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Bowling Green, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Buffalo, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Covington, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Cynthiana, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Danville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Flemingsburg, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Frankfort, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Georgetown, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Greenville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Harlan, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Heidrick, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Henderson, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Henryville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Hopkinsville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Kitchen, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Lawrenceburg, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Lewisburg, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Lexington, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Madisonville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Marion, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Market House, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Mayfield, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Maysville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Midway, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about New Castle, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Olive Hill, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Owensboro, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Paducah, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Parker, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Pineville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Preachersville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Power House, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Russellville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Shelbyville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Stamping Ground, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Sacramento, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Stanley, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Upper, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Winchester, Kentucky in Wikipedia.
Read about Worthville, Kentucky in Wikipedia.

Outside Kentucky Place Name

References

Cited in this Entry

NKAA Source: Report on the motor vehicle industry : pursuant to Joint Resolution No.87 (H. J. Res. 594), Seventy-Fifth Congress, Third Session
NKAA Source: Negro women in industry
NKAA Source: A Working people: a history of African American workers since Emancipation
NKAA Source: The Day book (newspaper)
NKAA Source: Richmond daily register (newspaper)
NKAA Source: The Negro in the automobile industry
NKAA Source: Annals of the American academy of political and social science (periodical)
NKAA Source: Journal of political economy (periodical)
NKAA Source: The Quarterly journal of economics (periodical)
NKAA Source: African Americans in the U.S. economy
NKAA Source: Great Depression: people and perspectives
NKAA Source: Black Detroit and the rise of the UAW
NKAA Source: Encyclopedia of African American society
NKAA Source: Technology and the African-American experience: needs and opportunities for study
NKAA Source: Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of Kentucky with accompanying documents for the two years beginning July 1 ... and ending June 30 ... (periodical)
NKAA Source: Thirteenth census of the United States taken in the year 1910
NKAA Source: Fourteenth census of the United States.
State compendium. Kentucky. Statistics of population, occupations, agriculture, irrigation, drainage, manufactures, and mines and quarries for the state, counties, and cities
NKAA Source: Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930. Population, Volume II. General Report Statistics by Subject
NKAA Source: The Negro wage earner
NKAA Source: Facts and figures of the automobile industry : statistics of production, registration, export and use of motor cars and motor trucks (serial)
NKAA Source: The Gates open slowly : a history of education in Kentucky

Social Bookmarking

Cite This NKAA Entry:

“Automobile Industry Employment: Kentucky, African Americans,” Notable Kentucky African Americans Database, accessed December 15, 2018, http://nkaa.uky.edu/nkaa/items/show/300003682.

Last modified: 2018-11-12 16:32:15