From NKAA, Notable Kentucky African Americans Database (main entry)

New Homemakers of America, Kentucky

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The New Homemakers of America (NHA) was the African American organization that was to parallel the Future Homemakers of America (FHA). Both were established as segregated organizations for girls, beginning in 1945. The two organizations merged in 1965. Boys became members of the FHA starting in 1974-75. In 1999, FHA was renamed Family, Career and Community Leaders of America. The official magazine of the FHA was Teen Times, published four times per year. The official magazine for the NHA was Chatter Box, published two times per year. September 20, 1945, the Official Guide for the Organization and Development of the Program of the New Homemakers of America was published in Washington, D.C.

During the initial years of the FHA,1944-45, Kentucky was the first state to qualify for a state charter. Among the 16 southern states, Kentucky was 8th to have NHA Chapters; there were 27 chapters with 777 members [source: The Growth and Development of New Homemakers of America by M. C. Moffitt, p.43]. The next year, there were 28 chapters with 792 members. The goal of both the NHA and the FHA was to bring together high school and junior high school home economic clubs. NHA chapters were established in states that maintained segregated schools for African Americans. One of the NHA chapters was located at the Mayo-Underwood School in Frankfort, KY.

In 1949, the state body of the Kentucky NHA was reorganized to strengthen the organization [source: "Kentucky," Chatter Box, v.5, no.1, Fall 1949, p.6]. During the year, there were four district meetings and the state convention was held in June of 1949. Two years later, the spring rally was held at Kentucky State College [now Kentucky State University], and Mrs. Roxie B. Butler and her college homemaking students were hosts to the NHA delegates [source: "Kentucky in the spring," Chatter Box, v.6, no.2, Spring 1951, p.14]. The last year of the NHA, there were 2 chapters in Kentucky with 102 members; it was the lowest number of chapters and members per state [Mofitt, p.57].

For more see History of FHA-FCCLA, a Nicholas County, KY, school website; Chatter Box: for New Homemakers of America, 1945-1965 [bound issues of the Chatter Box publication]; and The Growth and Development of New Homemakers of America by M. C. Moffitt. There are photographs of members of the New Homemakers of America at Kentucky State University, within the Rufus Ballard Atwood Papers, ca. 1929-1965: New Homemakers of America - Photographs -, [n.d] [box: 27, folder: 10].

  • National Officers of the NHA from Kentucky -- Sources: The Growth and Development of New Homemakers of America by M. C. Moffitt, pp.101-106; and Chatter Box 
    1. Patricia Jane Small, Elkton, V. P. Sec. B, 1952 [previously served as Kentucky NHA reporter and historian]
    2. Barbara Lynem, Frankfort, V. P. Sec. B, 1953 (replaced P. Small)
    3. Emolyne Hines, Anchorage, Treasurer, 1954
    4. Lois Robertson, Louisville, Treasurer, 1955
    5. Mary Lois Williamson, State Adviser, 1954-55
    6. Lois Irene Robinson, Drakesboro, Secretary, 1955
    7. Emolyne Hines, Anchorage, Secretary, 1956
    8. Maxine Brown, V. P. Sec. B, 1956
    9. Sandra C. Wright, Lincoln Ridge, V.P. Sec. B, 1956-57 (replaced Maxine Brown)
    10. Naomi Thomas, Hopkinsville, Chatter Box Committee, 1958-59
    11. Emilie High, State Adviser, 1958-59
    12. Gladys Carroll, Lincoln Ridge, Secretary, 1961-62
    13. Talberta Owens, Lexington, Historian, 1963
    14. Barbara Ann Williams, Lincoln Ridge, Historian, 1963-64 (replaced T. Owens) [also served as member of the national executive council, Kentucky NHA secretary, and president of Kentucky NHA Association]
  • New Homemakers of America, Kentucky Chapters -- Source: Chatter Box
  1. Benham High School, Benham
  2. Bond-Washington High School, Elizabethtown
  3. Caverna Independent High School, Horse Cave
  4. Douglas High School, Lexington
  5. Drakesboro Community School, Drakesboro
  6. Dunbar High School, Somerset
  7. DuBois High School, Mt. Sterling
  8. Liberty High School, Hazard
  9. Lincoln Institute, Lincoln Ridge
  10. Mayo-Underwood High School, Frankfort
  11. Palmer-Dunbar High School, Wheelwright
  12. Riverview High School, Hickman
  13. Todd County High School, Todd County
  • Three photograhs within the Rufus Ballard Atwood Papers, ca.1929-1965: New Homemakers of America - Photographs -, [n.d], Box 27, folder 10. Back of photos: George A. Hall Studios, 214 W. 2nd Street, Frankfort. Items in Kentucky State University, Special Collections.
  1. Barbara Johnson, Western High School, Owensboro
  2. Bettie Ann Goodwin, Western High School, Owensboro
  3. Jamie Bell Brouaugh, Earlington
  4. Marie O. Drake, State President, Drakesboro

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References

Cited in this Entry

NKAA Source: Teen times: magazine of the Future Homemakers of America (periodical)
NKAA Source: Chatter Box: for New Homemakers of America, 1945 - 1965 (periodicals)
NKAA Source: Official guide for the organization and development of the program of the New Homemakers of America
NKAA Source: Chatter Box: for New Homemakers of America, 1945 - 1965 (periodicals)
NKAA Source: Chatter Box: for New Homemakers of America, 1945 - 1965 (periodicals)
NKAA Source: The Growth and development of the New Homemakers of America

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“New Homemakers of America, Kentucky,” Notable Kentucky African Americans Database, accessed November 20, 2017, http://nkaa.uky.edu/nkaa/items/show/2882.

Last modified: 2017-09-28 17:51:50