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125th Infantry
Start Year : 1865
End Year : 1867
The 125th Infantry was one of the 41 regiments authorized by Congress during the Civil War. There were four African American units, two in the South and two on the Western Frontier. The 125th Infantry was organized in Spring 1865 in Louisville, KY. The enlistees had to commit to three years of service. During August 1866, eight companies of the 125th were transferred to Mexico and remained there until they were replaced between September and December of 1867. The eight companies were the first African American troops to serve at Ft. Selden. The 125th was eventually sent to Fort Riley, Kansas, where the men were discharged, and the 125th Infantry was disbanded on December 20, 1867. For more see The Buffalo Soldiers: a narrative of the Negro Cavalry in the West, by W. H. Leckie.
Subjects: Migration West, Military & Veterans
Geographic Region: Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky / Fort Riley, Kansas / Fort Selden, New Mexico

1826 Slave Revolt on Ohio River
Start Year : 1826
On September 17, 1826, Bourbon County, KY, slave traders Edward Stone and his nephew Howard Stone were among the five white men killed by the 75 or so slaves who were being taken down river aboard a flatboat. Edward Stone had kept his slaves in Bourbon County, chained and shackled beneath his house. In September of 1826, a group of the slaves were marched to Mason County, KY, where they were taken aboard the flatboat headed to the Mississippi slave market. David Cobb of Lexington, KY, and James Gray were hired to convey the crew down the Ohio River. The boat stopped in Louisville, KY, where a white man named Davis boarded the boat. Davis was from Natchez, MS, or Paris, KY, depending on which account you read. The boat had gone about another 100 miles when the slaves revolted and killed the five white men and threw their bodies overboard. The 75 slaves, males and females of various ages, attempted to escape into Indiana, which had become a state in 1816 with a constitution that prohibited slavery [read more at IN.gov], though there were both free Blacks and slaves in the state. There were also active Underground Railroad stations in Indiana [read more at IN.gov], two of which were along the Ohio River bordering Kentucky and near Breckinridge County, KY. In 1824, Indiana passed one of the earliest forms of a fugitive slave law [read more at IN.gov]. The slaves who had escaped from the flatboat were fugitives, property that could be reclaimed. Fifty-six of the slaves were captured and returned to Kentucky to be lodged in the Hardinsburg [Breckinridge County] jail. A Baltimore newspaper reported that some of the slaves were brought to Maryland and sold. Three of the slaves supposedly admitted taking part in the revolt. Nothing is known or has ever been written about the 19 slaves who escaped, nor has it been acknowledged that there were slaves on the flatboat who made their way to freedom. "...[T]he balance separated, and as yet have not been heard of."- - [source: "To the editor: Hardinsburg, Sept. 19, 1826," Richmond Enquirer, 10/17/1826, p. 4]. A possibility that has not been discussed in the literature suggests there may have been a prepared plan for the slaves to escape into Indiana and make their way further north via the Underground Railroad. Reading, writing, and knowledge of maps would not have been necessary in order for the slaves to have known about Under Ground Railroad stations on the Indiana border; messages and codes were passed between slaves in the form of songs and quilts and other non-written methods. The focus of the newspapers during the time of the revolt and later written histories centers on the killing of the five white men, the capture of the 56 slaves, and the subsequent trial and executions. Five of the captured slaves were hanged: their names, the only names given to any of the slaves in the newspapers, were Jo, Duke, Resin, Stephen, and Wesley [source: If We Must Die, by E. R. Taylor, p. 162]. One other slave named Roseberry's Jim is mentioned in the Village Register newspaper article, "The Negro Trial" dated 11/14/1826. According to the article, five of the slaves were hanged; forty-seven were sold; the remainder was brought back to Bourbon County. One of the slaves was a mulatto boy named Louis (or Lewis) who was not for sale; he was Edward Stone's body servant and had tried to save Stone's life, but he too was beaten during the revolt [source: "To the editor: Hardinsburg, Sept. 19, 1826," Richmond Enquirer, 10/17/1826, p. 4]. Four months after the revolt, Louis (or Lewis) was given his freedom by Stone's widow in January of 1827. According to author J. W. Coleman, he remained in Kentucky on the land and in the house he was given near the Edward Stone house in Bourbon County [source: Slavery Times in Kentucky, by J. Winston Coleman, pp. 174-176].

 

Edward Stone was one of the first slave traders to openly advertise his intentions of selling slaves to the Deep South markets. Much of what has been written about the day of his death contains varying and sometimes conflicting details, as well as name variations for the men who were killed and various accounts as to how the day unfolded. For additional information see "Horrible Massacre" in the column headed "Louisville, Ken. Sept. 23" in the Baltimore Patriot & Mercantile Advertiser, 10/07/1826, p. 2; "The Louisville, Kentucky, paper...," Norwich Courier, 10/11/1826, p. 2; Speculators and Slaves by M. Tadman; I've Got a Home in Glory Land, by K. S. Frost, Chapter 3 - On Jordan's Bank; Black Heritage Sites, pp. 110-111, by N. C. Curtis; and Encyclopedia of the Underground Railroad, by J. Blain Hudson. See also Ancestry.com website Edward Stone by N. A. Bristow; blog entry Edward Stone's Demise, by T. Talbott; and Edward Stone in the History of Slavery: Glossary, a Kentucky Educational Television Underground Railroad website.

 

 
See photo image of Edward Stone's house, The Grange, photo image in Explore UK.
Subjects: Executions, Freedom, Rioting, Insurrections, Panics, Protests in Kentucky, Riots and Protests Outside Kentucky
Geographic Region: Bourbon County, Kentucky / Mason County, Kentucky / Hardinsburg, Breckinridge County, Kentucky / Indiana / Mississippi / Maryland

1878 Abdallah Park "Colored" Fair (Harrison County, KY)
Start Year : 1878
"I wonder how many who read this will remember when our colored citizens gave a fair at Abdallah Park? Along about 1878, I put it, and I was there. My father allowed his stable boy to show some stock and sent me along to act as kind of fiduciary agent." For more about the fair and additional history, see "African-American Life in Cynthiana - 1870 - 1940," Harrison Heritage News, February 2004, vol. 5, no. 2 (published monthly by Harrison County Historical Society. PO Box 411, Cynthiana, KY 41031).
Subjects: Colored Fairs, Black Expos, and Chautauquas, Parks
Geographic Region: Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky

1924 third annual fair and premium list of New Colored Shelby County Fair Association, Inc.
Start Year : 1924
Held Wednesday, Thursday, & Friday, September 3, 4 & 5, 1924. At the Shelby County A. & M. Association Fair Grounds near Shelbyville, Ky. Shelbyville, Ky.: Shelby News Press, 1924. Publication available at the Filson Historical Society Library (in the Rare Pamphlet Collection, RB Pamphlet 394.2 N532 1924), in Louisville, KY. An earlier Colored Fair was held in Shelbyville in 1900, the Southern Railroad offered route services to the fair for low rates. See "Low rates via Southern Railroad" in the Mt. Sterling Advocate, 08/28/1900, p.1.
Subjects: Colored Fairs, Black Expos, and Chautauquas
Geographic Region: Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky

1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky
Start Year : 1940
In 1940, there were about 2,800 Kentucky-born persons in the shoe care business, and of that number, at least 277 were African Americans according to the U.S. Federal Census. Though sometimes referred to as "shoe shine boys," these were adult men and a few women, many of whom were supporting families. The number does not include self-employed boys and men shining shoes on the street. The 277 Kentucky African Americans in the shoe care business were employed in barber shops or shoe shops in Kentucky and elsewhere. They were few in number when compared to the more than 160,000 adults in the United States who shined, repaired, and made shoes in 1940 [source: U.S. Federal Census]. The significance to Kentucky is that since the days of slavery, the shoe care business that was once dominated by African Americans continued as a base employment for African Americans four decades into the 20th Century. More than 7,800 adult African Americans made a living caring for shoes in the United States in 1940, this includes at least 277 Kentucky competitors during one of the toughest economic times in the history of the United States [source: 1940 U.S. Federal Census]. There was the continuing economic depression and World War II was still in progress.  It would be another year before the United States entered the war after Pearl Harbor was bombed on December 7, 1941. The NAACP was pushing for the U.S. Armed Forces to be integrated. In Kentucky, it was the beginning of a wave of out-migration that would result in 13% of the population leaving for manufacturing jobs in northern states [source: A New History of Kentucky by L. H. Harrison and J. C. Klotter]. This wave would happen a little later for African Americans because discrimination and segregation barred most from manufacturing jobs in 1940 when 412 of every 1,000 African American men were still employed in farm labor [source: "Employment and education" on pp.509 in Encyclopedia of African American History, 1896 to present, v.1, edited by P. Finkelman]. There were 71 shoe makers in Kentucky in 1940 according to the U.S. Federal Census: 46 born in KY; 16 born in another state; 2 with an unknown birth state; and others born in Germany (2), Italy (1), Russia (3), and Sweden (1).  Lexington had led the state with the most African American shoe makers in the 1800s, but Felix Chapman was the only one listed in the 1940 U.S. Census. For individuals, the business had changed from making shoes to caring for shoes. From 1930-1947, there were little more than 100 African American shoe repairers and shoe shiners in Lexington. The business of shoe care would continue to change with continued northern migration, the U.S. involvement in WWII, and fair employment guidelines at the national level. In 1940, Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) won his third term as President of the United States and Henry A. Wallace became Vice President. Keen Johnson (D) was Kentucky Governor and Rodes K. Myers was Lieutenant Governor. The annual average income of employed persons in the United States was $1,368, and the unemployment rate had been 18.26% during the 1930s [source: D. Petro, "Brother can you spare a dime? The 1940 Census: employment and income," Prologue Magazine, Spring 2012, v.44, no.1 (online at National Archives website)]. The average annual income for African American males was $537.45, which would start to increase after the 1941 Fair Employment Practice Committee was established to monitor the hiring practices of companies with government contracts [source: African Americans in the Twentieth Century by T. N. Maloney, an E.H.net website]. For more see History: 1940 Overview, a U.S. Census Bureau website; M. S. Bedell, "Employment and income of Negro workers 1940-52," Monthly Labor Review, v.76, no.6, June 1953, pp.596-601; The Path to Mechanized Shoe Production in the United States by R. Thomson; Feet and Footwear: a cultural encyclopedia by M. DeMello; and The Shoe Shine Buff: the professional shoe care book by J. McGowan.

 

Click on the links below for the first 74 names of 277 adult African Americans born in Kentucky and employed in the shoe care business in 1940 [source: U.S. Federal Census].

Last Names A

Last Names B

Last Names C

Last Names D

Last Names E

Last Names F

Last Names G
Subjects: Shoes: Finishers, Makers, Repairers, Shiners, Stores
Geographic Region: Kentucky

1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky [TABLE A]
Start Year : 1940
The table below has the names (A) of adult African Americans born in Kentucky and employed in the shoe care business in 1940 [source: U.S. Federal Census]. 

 

NAMES                HOME LOCATION        EMPLOYMENT

Paul Allen           Taylor County, KY       shoe shiner at barber shop

Ernest Ayers       Newport, KY               shoe shiner prop. of shoe parlor

 

[click here] for the accompanying NKAA entry 1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky.

 
Subjects: Shoes: Finishers, Makers, Repairers, Shiners, Stores
Geographic Region: Kentucky

1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky [TABLE B]
Birth Year : 1940
The table below has the names (B) of adult African Americans born in Kentucky and employed in the shoe care business in 1940 [source: U.S. Federal Census].

 

NAMES                        HOME LOCATION          EMPLOYMENT

Robey Babb                  Indianapolis, IN             shoe shiner at barber shop

Carter Babb                  Indianapolis, IN             shoe shiner at barber shop

Harvey Bailey                Louisville, KY                 shoe finisher at shoe repair shop

Lamuel Ballew              Cincinnati, OH               shoe shiner in shining parlor

George Ballew              Richmond, KY                shoe repairer at Embry Shoe Shop

William Barnes              Trigg County, KY           shoe shiner at barber shop

Herb Bassett                Aurora, IL                      shoe shiner at shoe parlor

Baker Bates                 Cleveland, OH               shoe finisher at shoe shop

John Beamur                Taylorsville, KY              shoe repairman at home

James Beard                Louisville, KY                 shoe repairer, owns shop

Marie Beard                  Louisville, KY                 helper in shoe shop

John Bishop                  Dayton, OH                   shoe shine boy at shoe repair shop

Grandison Blakey         Louisville, KY                 shoe dyer at shoe repair shop

Irvine D. Blyote            Richmond, KY                shoe shiner

John Boggs                  Richmond, KY                shoe repairer, owns shop

Walter Boston              Augusta, KY                  shoe shiner at barber shop

Ed Bridwell                   Louisville, KY                 shoe shiner at a club

George W. Brown        Paducah, KY                  shoe shiner at barber shop

Lillian Brown                Louisville, KY                 shoe repairer at repair shop

Willie Brown                 Lexington, KY               shoe shiner at shoe shining parlor

William Brown              Covington, KY               shoe shiner at barber shop

William Burks               Frankfort, KY                 shoe shiner at barber shop

William Burley              Frankfort, KY                 shoe shine boy, private work

 

[click here] for the accompanying NKAA entry 1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky. 

 
Subjects: Shoes: Finishers, Makers, Repairers, Shiners, Stores
Geographic Region: Kentucky

1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky [TABLE C]
Start Year : 1940
The table below has the names (C) of adult African Americans born in Kentucky and employed in the shoe care business in 1940 [source: U.S. Federal Census].

 

NAMES                     HOME LOCATION        EMPLOYMENT

Charles Cerd             Rome, GA                      shoe shine boy at barber shop

Felix Chapman          Lexington, KY                shoe maker at shoe repair shop

W. M. Christian         Elkton, KY                      shoe shiner at barber shop

Jim Clark                   Pineville, KY                   shoe shiner at barber shop

Raymond Clark         Pineville, KY                   shoe shiner at barber shop

Harding Clay             Frankfort, KY                 shoe shine boy at barber shop

James Cobb              Toledo, OH                    shoe shiner at barber shop

Mathew Cornett        Hazard, KY                    shoe shiner at barber shop

 

[click here] for the accompanying NKAA entry 1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky.

 

 
Subjects: Shoes: Finishers, Makers, Repairers, Shiners, Stores
Geographic Region: Kentucky

1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky [TABLE D]
Start Year : 1940
The table below has the names (D) of adult African Americans born in Kentucky and employed in the shoe care business in 1940 [source: U.S. Federal Census].

 

NAMES                          HOME LOCATION         EMPLOYMENT

Reed Davidson               Kokomo, IN                   shoe shiner at shoe repair shop

Murry Davis                    Cleveland, OH               shoe shine boy at terminal

Joe Davis                        Lexington, KY               shoe repairman at public shoe hospital

Herman Dinwiddie          Paducah, KY                  shoe repairer at shoe shop

Harold Doe                     Berea, KY                      janitor & shoe shining at barber shop

John Douglas                 Indianapolis, IN            shoe shiner, own self

Howard L. Drane           Mayfield, KY                   shoe shiner at barber shop

Lane Dun, Jr.                 Allen County, KY            shoe black at barber shop

Flocy Durrette               Canton, OH                    shoe woman with WPA Project

Dan Duton                    Pikeville, KY                    shoe polisher at barber shop

 

[click here] for the accompanying NKAA entry 1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky.

 
Subjects: Shoes: Finishers, Makers, Repairers, Shiners, Stores
Geographic Region: Kentucky

1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky [TABLE E]
Start Year : 1940
The table below has the names (E) of adult African Americans born in Kentucky and employed in the shoe care business in 1940 [source: U.S. Federal Census].

 

NAMES                     HOME LOCATION      EMPLOYMENT

Gaither Edmonds       Elkton, KY                 shoe shiner at barber shop

Eugene C. Edward      Palo Alto, CA             shoe shiner at Army post

Glession Elliot            Burkesville, KY          shoe shine boy at barber shop

Shelby Ellis               Portland, OR             shoe shiner at ???? station

Louis Elmore             Dayton, OH              shoe shiner at barber shop

Millard Evans             Knoxville, TN            shoe maker at shoe repair shop

Perry Everett             Cincinnati, OH           shoe shiner at cobling shop

 

[click here] for the accompanying NKAA entry 1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky.

 

 
Subjects: Shoes: Finishers, Makers, Repairers, Shiners, Stores
Geographic Region: Kentucky

1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky [TABLE F]
Start Year : 1940
The table below has the names (F) of adult African Americans born in Kentucky and employed in the shoe care business in 1940 [source: U.S. Federal Census].

 

NAMES                          HOME LOCATION               EMPLOYMENT

Corneles Ferguson          Muhlenberg County, KY      shoe shiner at private barber shop

William Fisher                Louisville, KY                     shoe shiner at shoe repair co.

Nathan P. Fletcher          Rushville, IN                      shoe repairer, owns shop

Lowell Ford                    Metropolis, IL                     shoe shiner at barber shop

Fred Foster                    Green County, KY               shoe black at barber shop

O. J. Franklin                 San Francisco, CA               assistant at shoe shine parlor

Claude Robert Franklin    Louisville, KY                     shoe shine boy at barber shop

 

[click here] for the accompanying NKAA entry 1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky.

 

 
Subjects: Shoes: Finishers, Makers, Repairers, Shiners, Stores
Geographic Region: Kentucky

1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky [TABLE G]
Start Year : 1940
The table below has the names (G) of adult African Americans born in Kentucky and employed in the shoe care business in 1940 [source: U.S. Federal Census].

 

NAMES                    HOME LOCATION          EMPLOYMENT

Byron Gaines            Dawson Springs, KY      shoe shiner at barber shop

Harry A. Gaines         Dawson Springs, KY      shoe shiner at barber shop

Major Gardener         Oklahoma City, OK      porter & shoe shine boy at shoe rebuilder

William Gardner        Chicago, IL                 shoe shining, owns parlor

Ray Gardner             Chicago, IL                 shoe shining, owns parlor

Henry D. Gentry        Winchester, KY            shoe shiner at Brooks Shop

Warren George         Middlesborough, KY     shoe shine boy at shoe shop

William Gilcrest         Pasadena, CA             shoe shiner at private practice

Robert Golden          Louisville, KY              shoe shiner at shine shop

Raymond Grady        Lansing, MI                shoe shiner at shoe shine stand

Fred Green               Lawrenceburg, IN        shoe shiner at shoe store

Robert Grant            Frankfort, KY              shoe shine boy, private work

William J. Griffith      Calhoun, KY               shoe shiner at barber shop

Arthur Grimmett        Cleveland, OH            shoe repairman at shoe repair factory

Woodrow Grissom      Adair County, KY         shoe shine boy at barber shop

 

[click here] for the accompanying NKAA entry 1940 - Shoe Makers, Repairers, and Shiners, Kentucky.

 

 
Subjects: Shoes: Finishers, Makers, Repairers, Shiners, Stores
Geographic Region: Kentucky

20th-Century Photos of Ex-Slaves
Start Year : 1929
End Year : 1939
This is a flickr site by beeskep that contains photograph images of former slaves who were interviewed for the Slave Narratives. Documenting the lives of former slaves began in 1929 at Fisk College [now Fisk University] and at Southern [now Southern University and A&M College]. The work was continued by Kentucky State College [now Kentucky State University] in 1934. The narratives were part of the Federal Writer's Project of the Works Progress Administration (WPA).

Subjects: Freedom, Photographers, Photographs, Works Progress Administration (WPA) / Work Projects Adminstration (WPA)
Geographic Region: Unites States

48th and 49th U.S. Volunteer Infantries, American-Philippine War
Start Year : 1899
End Year : 1902
The 48th and 49th Infantries, organized in 1899, were African American volunteer regiments that were enlisted for battle in the American-Philippine War. The line officers were African Americans; it was during President McKinley's second term in office that the 48th and 49th were formed with the appointment of 24 Captains, 50 1st Lieutenants, 48 2nd Lieutenants, and there were 2,688 enlisted men, all African Americans. The field and staffs were white. The regiments arrived in the Philippines in January 1900, and were stationed in the Department of Northern Luzon. The units had their share of racial problems and the African American officers were treated as enlisted men. There was opposition to the war from African American leaders in the U.S., such as Bishop Henry M. Turner, Booker T. Washington, and Washington, D.C. newspaper editor E. E. Cooper. After a year and a half, the 48th and 49th were the last of the volunteer forces to return to the U.S., in May and June of 1901. Of all the U.S. volunteer regiments in the Philippines, the 48th and 49th had the least desertions and the least reports of abuse of the Filipino people. Private Thomas Taylor, 14 year old from Winchester, KY, was one of the youngest U.S. volunteers in the Philippines.

Listed in the 1900 U.S. Federal Census among the 125 men in Company A, 49th Regiment Volunteer Infantry, were twelve Kentucky natives.

  • Danville - Private Govenor Durham b.1875
  • Frankfort - 2nd Lieutenant Henry Walls b.1870
  • Lexington - Corporal Clifford Chambers b.1880
  • Franklin - Private Abby Anderson b.1878, and Private James Turner b.1878
  • Louisville - Corporal Lenwood Kendall b.1878, Corporal John VanDyke b.1872, Private James J. Lewis b.1876, Private William Logwood b.1878, Private Charley Miles b.1878, Private Sam Turner b.1877
  • Mt. Sterling - Private Keas Anderson b.1878
Listed in the 1900 U.S. Federal Census among the more than 200 men in Company G, 48th Regiment Volunteer Infantry, are more than 60 Kentucky natives, many from Winchester, KY.
  • Carlisle - Private George Price b.1878
  • Cynthiana - Musician Edward J. Berryman b.1879, Private Virgil Asberry b.1880, Private James H. Block b.1880, Private James L. Bradshaw b.1877, Private Calvern Hill b.1880, Private Sanford Holmes b.1879, Private John Ingles b.1876, Private Newell G. Lattamore b.1866
  • Elizabethtown - Private Edward Clark b.1879
  • Frankfort - Private Abe Crocket b.1871
  • Jamestown - Private John Wallace b.1873
  • Lexington - Private Joseph Adley b.1880, Private William D. Carter b.1873
  • Louisville - Private Robert Parrish b.1881
  • Mildale - Sergeant William H. Jones b.1869
  • Newport - Corporal George E. Bassett b.1869
  • Paris - Corporal James Helvey b.1875, Musician James C. Whaley b.1882, Artificer George T. Robinson b. 1869, Private Richard Bedinger b.1878, Private Charles H. Robinson b.1879, Private John H. Robinson b.1880, Private Charles Steward b.1874, Private Thomas Turner b.1877
  • Richmond - Corporal Creed V. Irvine b.1881, Corporal Pleas Ferrill b.1880, Cook Wesley Harris b.1874, Private William Black b.1878, Private James G. Brock b.1878, Private John Dillingham b.1873, Private Merrill Gentry b.1878, Private John Russell b.1867, Private Auros White b.1878, Private Elder W. Campbell b.1872
  • Somerset - Private Kite Allen b.1881, Private Thomas Johnson b.1881
  • Shelbyville - Private Fleur Lavine b.1879
  • Winchester - Corporal John Clemens b.1860, Corporal Arthur Taylor b.1879, Corporal Robert Haggard b.1865, Private Thomas Downey b.1877, Private William Fulda b.1868, Private Isaac Gipson b.1881, Private Fred Kohlas b.1881, Private George W. Mills b.1881, Private Andrew Poston b.1865, Private Lee Taylor b.1881, Corporal Spencer Turner b.1880, Private Allen Childs b.1877, Private Samuel Duncan b.1880, Private Richard Hunter b.1882, Private William T. Rones b.1880, Private Robert Simpson b.1880, Private Thomas Taylor b.1885, Private William Taylor b.1879, Private Henry Watts b.1882, Private Parker Wells b.1881, Private Joseph Williams b.1882, Private Theodore Wilson b.1880
  • Kentucky (no city given) - Private Daneal Amos b.1879, Private Edward Clay b.1877, Private James Judy b.1872, Private Edward Smith b.1877

For more information see "Negro Volunteer Regiments in Spanish-American War" in Negro Year Book, 1916-1917 edited by M. N. Work [available online at Google Book Search]; John Scott Reed, "Black Volunteer Troops in the Spanish-Cuban/American War and the Philippine War (1898-1901)" in The War of 1898 and the U.S. Interventions, 1898-1934 by B. R. Beede; for more on the encounters of the 48th and 49th, see Annual Report of Major General Adna R. Chaffee, U.S. Army, Commanding Division of the Philippines, vol.II, 1901 [available full view at Google Book Search]; and "Black Americans in the U.S. Military from the American Revolution to the Korean War" a New York State Military Museum website.
Subjects: Military & Veterans
Geographic Region: Kentucky / Philippines, Asia

78th Tank Battalion
Start Year : 1941
The battalion was the first Black Armor Unit formed by the U.S. Army, January 13, 1941. The men reported to Ft. Knox, KY, to begin warfare training in March 1941. The battalion was re-designated the 758th Tank Battalion in May 1941. It was the first African American tank battalion to fight in World War II. The battalion was reactivated in 1946 and re-designated as the 64th Tank Battalion, later fighting in the Korean War. For more see Liberators: fighting on two fronts in World War II, by L. Potter, et al.
Subjects: Military & Veterans
Geographic Region: Fort Knox, Bullitt, Hardin, & Meade Counties, Kentucky

800 Camp Street Neighborhood (Indianapolis, IN)
The Camp Street neighborhood became predominately African American in the 20th Century.  The residents included Kentucky natives such as 23-year old widow Susan Neely and her 16-year old brother Arthur, who was a tailor. Anna Poole was a 53 year old  domestic worker who was also a widow.  For more see Ransom Place Archaeology, IUPUI Archaeology Field School; the historical research was conducted by Dr. Susan Sutton's [ssutton@iupui.edu] Spring 2000 Urban Anthropology Class. See IUPUI 2003 Archaeology Field School for information on African Americans from Kentucky who lived on Agnes Street, such as Edmund and Mary Moore.
Subjects: Communities, Migration North
Geographic Region: Kentucky / Indianapolis, Indiana

82nd PGA Golf Championship (Louisville, KY)
Start Year : 2000
Golfer Tiger Woods won the 82nd PGA Championship, beating Bob May in a three-hole playoff at Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky, on August 20, 2000. The tournament purse was $5,000,000. Woods, who was 24 years old, received the Wanamaker Trophy and $900,000. Bob May received $540,000. The Valhalla Golf Club is a private golf club designed by Jack Nicklaus and owned by the PGA of America. Both the 1996 and 2000 PGA Championships were held at Valhalla, and the 2008 Ryder Cup will also be held there. For more on the 82nd PGA Championship see J. Demling, "Tiger makes history with Valhalla win," Courier-Journal, 08/21/2000. See photo image of Tiger Woods with the championship trophy and other images at PGA Championship History Exhibit website.



Subjects: Golf and Golfers
Geographic Region: Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

 

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